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I know that generally, wingtip vortices increase in strength as the angle of attack increases. Is the critical angle of attack/Cl Max the peak strength, or do the vortices generally continue to increase in intensity once the plane is in a stalled condition? For the purpose of this question, assume straight and level flight in smooth air.

I know if it is taken to an extreme, such as a 90 degree angle of attack, there would no longer be wingtip vortices, just turbulent flow and drag.

If it doesn't peak at the critical AOA, where does it peak?

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    $\begingroup$ Pretty sure the peak is at Clmax. I've always thought of induced drag as the energy consumed in redirecting the air to generate lift, including the efficiency losses of air leaking around the tip, but I'm probably wrong. $\endgroup$ – John K Jul 9 at 21:49
  • $\begingroup$ Note that I think that the max being at the critical AOA/Cl Max is right and would also be my guess based on definitions. In order to learn more, I would like to see measurements. I am hoping someone may have access to aerodynamic simulation software who could generate a data graph to prove the abstract hypothesis. $\endgroup$ – Ryan Mortensen Jul 10 at 18:44
  • $\begingroup$ @JZYL I know what you're getting at and was considering changing it already. It's fixed. $\endgroup$ – Ryan Mortensen Jul 11 at 19:17
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do the vortices generally continue to increase in intensity once the plane is in a stalled condition? For the purpose of this question, assume straight and level flight in smooth air

These sentences are contradictory. Never mind.

The strength of the tip vortices post-stall depends on the wing's stalling characteristics. If the inboard section stalls first (which is desirable because it helps keep the ailerons functional) then the tip vortices will continue to increase with angle of attack until the tip section itself stalls. At that point lift near the tips drops sharply and the vortices will decrease accordingly.

If the plane is capable of post-stall flight at extreme AoA, it will not be travelling fast enough for the vortices to maintain significant energy.

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