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I fly VFR. I found all the information about the airspaces and I believe I understood everything. What I'm still struggling to find is how to properly arrive and depart surface class E airspace surrounding certain airports. I never practiced that before and non of my instructors ever mentioned how to do that. What I understood from class E descriptions, I have to get authorization to enter surface class E airspace. How to do that? What frequency to use? Where to find it? What exactly should I say? What to expect in reply? Can I do touch an goes there? Is it possible that my request will be declined? Does anybody have a youtube URL showing an example how to do that?

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    $\begingroup$ You are not required to get authorization to enter class E airspace. This is fundamental ground school and pre-solo 101 information you should be discussing with your CFI. $\endgroup$ Jun 19 '20 at 16:41
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to aviation.SE! Are you asking about the US, or another country? $\endgroup$
    – Pondlife
    Jun 19 '20 at 16:42
  • $\begingroup$ It would also be helpful if you can give us a specific example of an airport that you're asking about. $\endgroup$
    – Pondlife
    Jun 19 '20 at 16:57
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry I didn't mentioned that - yes, I'm asking about the US. Accordingly to this faa.gov/uas/resources/events_calendar/archive/…, see surface class E Type E2 Authorization Needed. I found other sources stating the same. KTPL for example. How to properly get that authorization? $\endgroup$
    – Alex K
    Jun 19 '20 at 17:35
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    $\begingroup$ The document in that link is for Part 107 operations. If you are flying a manned aircraft VFR, you are not flying Part 107. You are flying Part 91 at the very least or possibly Part 103. $\endgroup$
    – Dean F.
    Jun 19 '20 at 17:39
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Class E airspace has no requirements for communication when flying VFR. You only have to maintain two-way communication in Class E airspace when flying IFR. All airports where there is an operating control tower requires two-way communication within 4 Nautical Miles of the airport housing the control tower at and below 2500 feet AGL at a minimum, regardless of airspace. You basically treat all airports with an operating control tower like a Class D airport. A, B and C airspace rules are even more strict. You maintain that communication either through radio or light gun signals.

§91.127 Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class E airspace.
(a) Unless otherwise required by part 93 of this chapter or unless otherwise authorized or required by the ATC facility having jurisdiction over the Class E airspace area, each person operating an aircraft on or in the vicinity of an airport in a Class E airspace area must comply with the requirements of §91.126.

(b) Departures. Each pilot of an aircraft must comply with any traffic patterns established for that airport in part 93 of this chapter.

(c) Communications with control towers. Unless otherwise authorized or required by ATC, no person may operate an aircraft to, from, through, or on an airport having an operational control tower unless two-way radio communications are maintained between that aircraft and the control tower. Communications must be established prior to 4 nautical miles from the airport, up to and including 2,500 feet AGL. However, if the aircraft radio fails in flight, the pilot in command may operate that aircraft and land if weather conditions are at or above basic VFR weather minimums, visual contact with the tower is maintained, and a clearance to land is received. If the aircraft radio fails while in flight under IFR, the pilot must comply with §91.185.

§91.126 Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class G airspace.
(a) General. Unless otherwise authorized or required, each person operating an aircraft on or in the vicinity of an airport in a Class G airspace area must comply with the requirements of this section.

(b) Direction of turns. When approaching to land at an airport without an operating control tower in Class G airspace—

(1) Each pilot of an airplane must make all turns of that airplane to the left unless the airport displays approved light signals or visual markings indicating that turns should be made to the right, in which case the pilot must make all turns to the right; and

(2) Each pilot of a helicopter or a powered parachute must avoid the flow of fixed-wing aircraft.

(c) Flap settings. Except when necessary for training or certification, the pilot in command of a civil turbojet-powered aircraft must use, as a final flap setting, the minimum certificated landing flap setting set forth in the approved performance information in the Airplane Flight Manual for the applicable conditions. However, each pilot in command has the final authority and responsibility for the safe operation of the pilot’s airplane, and may use a different flap setting for that airplane if the pilot determines that it is necessary in the interest of safety.

(d) Communications with control towers. Unless otherwise authorized or required by ATC, no person may operate an aircraft to, from, through, or on an airport having an operational control tower unless two-way radio communications are maintained between that aircraft and the control tower. Communications must be established prior to 4 nautical miles from the airport, up to and including 2,500 feet AGL. However, if the aircraft radio fails in flight, the pilot in command may operate that aircraft and land if weather conditions are at or above basic VFR weather minimums, visual contact with the tower is maintained, and a clearance to land is received. If the aircraft radio fails while in flight under IFR, the pilot must comply with §91.185.

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  • $\begingroup$ @AlexK- Are you flying a small UAS/UAV/drone? Are you operating under Title 14 CFR Part 107? Do you have an FAA UAS certificate? If all are yes, call the airport on the phone or drop by in person. If there is no one there, do not fly your drone there until contacting local approach control. If you are flying a drone without an FAA certificate, stay clear (stay out of) the airspace of the airport. If you are flying a manned aircraft, the documents to which you have linked do not apply to you. $\endgroup$
    – Dean F.
    Jun 19 '20 at 17:48
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, I just realized my mistake. Initially it seemed to me that what was stated there was related to the manned VFR as well. $\endgroup$
    – Alex K
    Jun 19 '20 at 17:50
  • $\begingroup$ Re "Class E airspace has no requirements for communication when flying VFR."-- this is not exactly true. Class-E-to-surface airspace can have communication requirements under certain weather conditions that are still legal for non-IFR flight. This is where Special VFR comes in. $\endgroup$ Nov 10 '20 at 20:49
  • $\begingroup$ @quietflyer - I see your point. It may be a matter of semantics since Special VFR is not VFR. One is different than the other with different rules and requirements. Especially at night. Such as the weather minimums for SVFR are 1 Statute Mile and Clear of Clouds. Flying VFR with weather conditions below 3 SM and 152 (instead of COC) would be against Part 61.155 regulations. $\endgroup$
    – Dean F.
    Nov 10 '20 at 21:28
  • $\begingroup$ @quietflyer - I see your point. It may be a matter of semantics since Special VFR is not VFR. One is different than the other with different rules and requirements. Especially at night. Such as the weather minimums for SVFR are 1 Statute Mile and Clear of Clouds. Flying VFR with weather conditions below 3 SM and 152 (CoC for takeoff and landing only) would be against Part 61.155 regulations. $\endgroup$
    – Dean F.
    Nov 10 '20 at 21:36

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