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Is it possible to fly an EASA registered airplane with an ICAO license?

My problem is the following: I have obtained my ICAO PPL license in Argentina with 52 flight hours but currently I live in Poland and I'm trying to convert to EASA PPL. I know I need 100 hours for the conversion process but it is not possible for me to travel to Argentina and fly those remaining 48 hours.

Am I able to fly the remaining 48 hours in Poland with my ICAO PPL?

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The ICAO doesn't issue licenses, so there's no such thing as an ICAO license. You have a license issues by the Argentine aviation authorities is ICAO compliant, which means it is recognized internationally, and you can fly Argentine registered airplanes anywhere in the world. It does not automatically give you privileges to fly airplanes of any other registration, so no you cannot fly Polish airplanes at this point.

There may be a way to do it, depending on the regulations in both countries. In some cases you can get a temporary license on the basis of your other license, or get some sort of other written permission. You would need to ask the Polish aviation authority what you need to do.

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Yes, it is possible. But, not in the sense that you are thinking. As GdD has pointed out, ICAO does not issue certificate nor register aircraft. Individual governing authorities of sovereign states do that. An ICAO certificate is a certificate compliant with ICAO standards. ICAO will recognize it. But, another governing body does not have to necessarily recognize it.

However, you may fly an aircraft as the sole manipulator of the flight controls while an instructor giving instruction acts as PIC. This would be a great way to get a jumpstart on your instrument rating while striving to meet the 100 hour EASA minimum. Even if it may not count towards PIC time in EASA countries (since you do not have an EASA certificate, it would count towards your total time. EASA might even have provisions for flying supervised solos or actual solo with an instructor’s endorsement.

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