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We know that the jet blast of jetliners - A320, B737 and bigger - are dangerous for people passing by, airport vehicles and even small planes, and we must always maintain a huge distance to avoid receiving this jet.

So, is there any risk or damage to other similar sized aircraft queuing for takeoff or whatever?

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Here you can clearly see the front one is turning. When they actually takes off, the waiting ones will either stay much farther behind or stay out of the blast. $\endgroup$ – user3528438 May 14 at 5:32
  • $\begingroup$ The wake of a large aircraft can, of course, cause serious problems for another large aircraft following in the air; American Airlines Flight 587 crashed because it flew into the wake of another aircraft and the first officer overreacted. $\endgroup$ – Michael Seifert May 14 at 14:07
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    $\begingroup$ @MichaelSeifert that was wake turbulence, not jet blast $\endgroup$ – Abdullah May 14 at 17:53
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    $\begingroup$ @Sanchises you sure? That was when jet blast melted snow on the plane which then froze again on bad places. Then crew mistakes combined to crash the plane. Isn't there anything worse that could happen? $\endgroup$ – Abdullah May 15 at 17:54
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    $\begingroup$ Hot air has been known to be ingested by the aircraft behind which can overheat engines and/or ECS leading to avionics cooling problems, particularly on hot days. In the case of avionics, there are thermal switches that will remove power before they get too hot and you will get a caution so it isn't really a risk as long as the pilot is monitoring their systems properly. $\endgroup$ – Craig May 25 at 2:34
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The airplanes in the photo are quite far apart, at least 1-2 lengths between each (it's just the long lens making them look cheek by jowl), and while in line going straight, they are only using a little over idle thrust to get rolling when required, so the jet blast effects are negligible. The main factor is FOD (foreign object damage) kicked up, and at that distance that would mean sand/dust particles, but the effects of that would be too subtle to measure over the long term in any reasonably clean environment.

That being said, if I was in a desert area where there was drifting sand on the taxiway, I would probably increase my spacing a bit behind the guy ahead. And you can bet that the guy in the (what looks to be a) King Air that is second in line in the pic - walking with the elephants - is keeping a little bit more distance from the elephant in front as well, owing to the size differential. If I was in the King Air I would be worried about the plane adding a big shot of thrust in both engines to start the turn (hopefully they'll just use the left engine), and the inside engine would be pointing straight at me part way through the turn, and I would be staying well back. Airmanship and all that...

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    $\begingroup$ You can seriously tell that's a King Air 2nd in line? Were you there??? That's some incredible plane spotting skillz! $\endgroup$ – FreeMan May 14 at 13:21
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    $\begingroup$ The engine nacelle is a PT-6 so a King Air is the most likely candidate. $\endgroup$ – John K May 14 at 13:47
  • $\begingroup$ Wow, even zoomed in it's difficult to see that nacelle. #Impressed $\endgroup$ – FreeMan May 14 at 17:34
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    $\begingroup$ There's no tail pipe out the back and you can make out one of the exhaust ducts just behind the prop. PT6. $\endgroup$ – John K May 14 at 17:51
  • $\begingroup$ John, i also cannot say if it's really a King Air. It almost doesn't appear at picture '-' $\endgroup$ – JeanExtreme002 May 14 at 22:16

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