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When a dual-engine aircraft (such as the B737, A320, A330, B777 or B787) has reached the point where it is too late to abort a take off, can it take off if one engine fails?

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    $\begingroup$ FYI:The Aero Commander was capable of taking off, flying and landing on a single engine while maintaining a high degree of stability. To prove this, and to enhance market recognition of the plane, in May of 1951, the Company successfully completed a flight from Oklahoma City to Washington DC loaded to full gross weight with one propeller removed from the plane. This was a first for the aviation industry and a strong demonstration of the asymmetric control and responsiveness of the Aero Commander. twincommander.com/history.html $\endgroup$ – Terry Jul 21 '14 at 6:54
  • $\begingroup$ @Terry: Granted, removing the one propeller would have given that Commander an additional advantage over merely leaving the engine off; even a feathered propeller still produces drag. $\endgroup$ – Sean Jan 10 at 0:51
  • $\begingroup$ @Terry Well, that was silly. Image if that engine had failed! $\endgroup$ – Cloud Feb 14 at 11:46
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    $\begingroup$ @Cloud Viewed from the standpoint of the aircraft manufacturer, the flight accomplished it's purpose. As I remember, the FAA (still the CAA back then) was withholding certification over questions about the aircraft's single engine performance. After this flight, they granted certification. Also, this was the same aircraft design that was used by Bob Hoover 30 years later in his aerobatic routine which he ended by gaining a bit of altitude, shutting down both engines, doing a few aerobatic maneuvers, and landing without power, usually rolling to a stop at predefined point in front of the crowd. $\endgroup$ – Terry Feb 15 at 6:43
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    $\begingroup$ @Cloud Google "bob hoover shrike commander engines out aerobatic routine". That brought up urls to 3 videos when I did it here a minute ago. $\endgroup$ – Terry Feb 15 at 21:30
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It is a regulatory requirement (EASA CS 25) that commercial aircraft can safely fly should one of the two engines fail at any point of the flight, including takeoff at speeds beyond $V1$. (the maximum speed at which it can still stop before the end of the runway).

Control Following Engine Failure 1 An acceptable means of showing compliance with CS 25.143(b)(1) is to demonstrate that it is possible to regain full control of the aeroplane without attaining a dangerous flight condition in the event of a sudden and complete failure of the critical engine in the following conditions:

a. At each take-off flap setting at the lowest speed recommended for initial steady climb with all engines operating after take-off, with – i. All engines, prior to the critical engine becoming inoperative, at maximum take-off power or thrust; ii. All propeller controls in the take-off position; iii. The landing gear retracted; iv. The aeroplane in trim in the prescribed initial conditions; and

b. With wing-flaps retracted at a speed of 1.23 VSR1 with – i. All engines, prior to the critical engine becoming inoperative, at maximum continuous power or thrust; ii. All propeller controls in the en-route position; iii. The landing gear retracted; iv. The aeroplane in trim in the prescribed initial conditions.

Source


For a clip of this happening just as the aircraft is rotating, take a look at this video:

A simulator video of the procedure is also available:

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