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How does a company like Martin Baker, evaluate the safety of their ejection seats. Are there any standard metrics or tests that exist? If not, what would be the suggested tests to be performed before they release the seat.

Edit: I am more interested in the type of data they collect from the tests. If I were to create a ejection seat on my own, what quantities would I use it to compare it against Martin Baker's seat?

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  • $\begingroup$ It's actually pretty common to modify a twin seat fighter to test the seat. The rear seat ejects the test unit with dummy weight while the pilot flies the airplane in the front seat. $\endgroup$ – user3528438 May 6 at 15:44
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    $\begingroup$ I remember reading that Martin Baker in particular build their seats in batches of 105, and then test-fire 5 of them. If any of the five fail the whole batch is scrapped. That was a while ago and I can't find a reference. I'll make this an answer if I find one. $\endgroup$ – DJClayworth May 6 at 15:54
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Martin-Baker tests their seats in an actual aircraft. They have, for some time now, used a Gloster Meteor to test their designs as discussed in this question. They also have a high speed sled at their facility for such tests.. 0-0 tests are easier to pull off since there is no moving component.

Individual components like explosive bolts or handles are likely tested like any other engineering component, in a test facility.

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    $\begingroup$ @MichaelHarvey I have updated to reflect, thank you. $\endgroup$ – Dave May 6 at 19:52
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EJECTION SEAT TESTING An intrepid employee, Bernard Lynch, attempted the first static ejection on 24th January 1945. He then conducted the first mid-flight test ejection on 24th July 1946. He ejected himself from the rear cockpit of a specially modified Meteor 3 at 320 mph, 8000 ft in the air. Bernard Lynch made a perfect landing and subsequently made a further 30 ejections.

But now they use dummies with sensors.

test

See this video and also this one

Source:

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