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My student studied his empennage off and got a 100% on his knowledge test. Usually, when I endorse students, there's a sentence that goes:

I have given [name] X hours of instruction on the areas in which he/she was found to be deficient on his/her airman knowledge test.

In this case, my student wasn't deficient on any areas of the knowledge test. Do I need to make that endorsement?

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    $\begingroup$ What country is this in? And what reg requires the endorsement? $\endgroup$ – user2168 Jul 18 '14 at 14:59
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If we're talking about FAA regs I'm not aware of any endorsement required if your student passes the test with a perfect score (they need an endorsement to take the test - I have given the instruction required by..., and they need an endorsement like the one in your question if they fail or don't manage a perfect score).

The endorsement above is intended for use when you need to endorse someone who failed to re-take the exam (similar to what's done if they fail a checkride), or when there's stuff to review from the knowledge test (My instructor combined it in my Checkride endorsement - And has demonstrated satisfactory knowledge of the areas found deficient on the knowledge test.

That said, it is probably a good idea to cover anything the student missed on the exam or doesn't feel 100% confident on, and to log that training - in this case if you do additional ground work you would just log it as you normally do...

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  • $\begingroup$ @CGCampbell Massively rewritten - do not post answers while at conventions :-P $\endgroup$ – voretaq7 Jul 18 '14 at 19:41
  • $\begingroup$ Also, as usual, There's an AC for this (AC 61-65E) $\endgroup$ – voretaq7 Jul 18 '14 at 19:43
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I obtained 100% on my Private Pilot Airplane Single Engine Land (ASEL) test in the US. My instructor didn't need to provide an additional endorsement.

However, upon seeing my score, the Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE) was especially tough. After a hard grilling, she admitted to me: "I wanted to go hard on you because 100% on your FAA test doesn't mean you know everything you need to be a safe pilot. The license you just got is a license to learn, with flying privileges - don't ever forget that."

I have taken that lesson home.

When I took the IFR FAA test, I purposely missed a question on a subject I was particularly strong in and got a 98%. When the DPE (a different one) asked me questions on the subject, he was pleased I understood the concepts very well.

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