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Reading up on some airports in Russia I noticed that some only supply TS-1 jet fuel (see point 7) instead of Jet A. I tried to find out more about this fuel, but only saw that it has a lower freezing point and a higher flash point. What I couldn't figure out was if this fuel is "compatible" with Jet A. Could a plane that usually flies with Jet A operate with TS-1 instead, or vice versa? My guess is yes, but I couldn't find anything authoritative about this.

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The answer is maybe. You would have to check the Fuel System Limitations in the Operating Limitations in the AFM of the aircraft in question to find a table or list of the approved fuel types, which may or may not include TS-1, and if it doesn't you're kind of stuck.

For example, if I look up the allowable fuel grades for the CRJ700, it includes several worldwide standards (American, British, Chinese, NATO etc), and a fuel type is listed as "RT" under CIS (Russia's official name - Commonwealth of Independent States I believe). But there is no listing for TS-1, so unless RT and TS-1 are the same thing and you have official documentation confirming that, it can't be used in the RJ (I'm retired and the pilot reference handbook I'm using is quite old and out of date so perhaps TS-1 is listed in current ones, but in any case you get the drift).

You can't use wide cut fuels in the CF-34 family (gasolene-kerosene) but if TS-1 is equivalent to Jet A there is a good chance it's approved for a particular airplane, but don't be surprised if there is a temperature limitation or other restriction.

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