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This question has been intriguing me for some time. In Autogyro the rotary blades merely acts as what fixed wings act in normal aircrafts to generate lift. So why not simply have a fixed wing instead of rotary "wings"? What advantage do this rotary nature of wings provide compared to fixed wings? In both ordinary planes and autogyros the propulsion is generated by the front or aft engine.

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  • $\begingroup$ @ManuH the article contrasts autogyro but the main feature that was mentioned by Robin was not there which is what I was looking for. $\endgroup$ – gfdsal Apr 9 at 17:26
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    $\begingroup$ you should explicit this in the description of your question This show your current level of research (that help us adapt the details of the answers) and avoid repeating facts that are already mentioned in other questions. $\endgroup$ – Manu H Apr 9 at 20:46
  • $\begingroup$ I am not sure what you mean I did explicitly mention what is the purpose of rotary wings over fixed wings. $\endgroup$ – gfdsal Apr 9 at 20:48
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    $\begingroup$ I mean, you should explicit what you didn't find in the (almost) dupe. $\endgroup$ – Manu H Apr 9 at 20:52
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Autogyro blades have a higher airspeed than the aircraft that is carrying them, so they can generate lift even when the aircraft speed is low. They fly as if they had a wing the size of the whole disk, not just the blade area - yet can be stored or transported easily.

They can land (but not take off) almost vertically, which is a useful safety feature in the event of an engine failure.

Having said that, they aren't common because they don't do anything useful significantly better than the other options, except perhaps being 'different and interesting'. Flying slowly isn't terribly useful.

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    $\begingroup$ Interesting fact. Gyrocopters were being considered by the Bureau of Land Management as a cheaper alternative to fixed-wing aircraft and other rotary-wing aircraft. They cost less to operate than a helicopter and have a lower procurement cost than most brand new airplanes. I don’t know how far they got in the project development phase. I think they got the idea from airborne cattle herders in Australia. $\endgroup$ – Dean F. Apr 9 at 14:52
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    $\begingroup$ "Flying slowly isn't terribly useful" Actually it is useful. Autogryo's are often used for wildlife surveys specifically because they fly so slow. They are also used for cable surveys (they are a lot cheaper to operate than helicopters) and even for anti-poaching operations in Africa. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Apr 9 at 15:24
  • $\begingroup$ +1 for mentioning They fly as if they had a wing the size of the whole disk, not just the blade area Now it makes lots of sense. $\endgroup$ – gfdsal Apr 9 at 15:27
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    $\begingroup$ Actually, there were and are gyroplanes that are capable of "jump" takeoff -- they have collective pitch control and a means of spinning up the rotor, then use the momentum of the rotor and a fast collective increase to "jump" off the ground; with the engine already powered up, then then transition into forward almost instantly. There was a commercial passenger model in the mid-20th century that could jump 6-10 meters when loaded. $\endgroup$ – Zeiss Ikon Apr 9 at 15:50
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    $\begingroup$ Jump takeoff gyros are today a rarity. I have been flying gyros for twenty years and have never seen an active jump-takeoff gyro. They can, however, be seen in museums... $\endgroup$ – xxavier Apr 10 at 2:24
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The autogyro was invented as an aircraft that cannot stall - a friend of the inventor was killed in an aircraft stall accident. The usefulness of the autogyro is that it was the necessary step on the way to inventing the helicopter.

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