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What is the name of the movement which begins after the plane lines up on the runway and takeoff clearance is received, and ends when the plane lifts off from the runway? Is it also called as 'taxiing'? I know that roll-out is used for plane's decelerating movement on the runway after landing; but what is the name of vice-versa?

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  • $\begingroup$ Related: What is a take off roll? $\endgroup$ – fooot Apr 5 at 20:37
  • $\begingroup$ It's actually two things: Ground run until rotation starts, rotation until lift off. $\endgroup$ – Peter Kämpf Apr 6 at 19:03
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Takeoff Roll

As per the FAA handbook (page 5-2)

  • Takeoff roll (ground roll) is the portion of the takeoff procedure during which the airplane is accelerated from a standstill to an airspeed that provides sufficient lift for it to become airborne.

And after that

  • Lift-off is when the wings are lifting the weight of the airplane off the surface. In most airplanes, this is the result of the pilot rotating the nose up to increase the angle of attack (AOA). >
  • The initial climb begins when the airplane leaves the surface and a climb pitch attitude has been established. Normally, it is considered complete when the airplane has reached a safe maneuvering altitude or an en route climb has been established.
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I've been flying since the mid 70s and the term has always been "line up" as a generic term to describe the process of moving out onto the runway and stopping once aligned with the runway centre line. As in, "when you line up prior to takeoff" when talking to a student.

When I was flying CRJs we would use the term "line up items" to describe pre-takeoff checklist items you do at the last minute while pulling out onto the runway (like selecting anti-ice, which had to be done as late as possible in the CRJ200 because its extremely hot evaporative WAI system would cook the deicing fluid on the ground).

As Carlo mentions, towers for all those years used the instruction "taxi to position and hold" until the change some years ago to "line up and wait". It wasn't necessary to explain to pilots what that meant when the change happened.

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    $\begingroup$ The question is asking about the phase after entering the runway but before leaving the ground. $\endgroup$ – Jacob Krall Apr 6 at 13:57
  • $\begingroup$ Yes but the question is not well worded. He was actually asking if the takeoff roll itself was considered taxiing. "Ending at the takeoff after the clearance", to Carlo and I, means a procedure that starts upon leaving the taxiway, before clearance is received, and ends at the start of the takeoff roll after the clearance is received. That's the line up. He should have just said, "is the rolling part of the takeoff still considered taxiing?" $\endgroup$ – John K Apr 6 at 16:29
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This used to be known by ATC phraseology as ‘taxiing into position’. I.e. were the aircraft is holding short of the runway safety area, ATC clearance for takeoff has been received, and the pilot release his brakes and taxis the aircraft into the runway safety area and lining up into a position to takeoff. After a fatal accident, I believe between the DC-9 and a PC 12, this term was changed to ‘lining up’ ie “Line Up and Wait”

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    $\begingroup$ This would be correct if the question were about what happens on the taxiing landes. However, the question specifically asks about the runway. $\endgroup$ – toolforger Apr 6 at 7:13

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