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I have spotted a line of traffic 1 minute apart, at least 12 objects, with 3 objects to the left and right of the main line of traffic. Clear night, no pollution, no noise, whit solid lights only. I know what satellites look like in the night sky and that is exactly what this looked like in terms of height and speed but there was a stream of them equally distanced apart with 3 random ones to either side of the line of objects. There was no strobe, the white light of each was showing form the front, side and rear. No green, no red.

I have never seen anything like this, nor have I ever posted anything like this but please if you know what this was let me know. Can re positioning aircraft because of covid-19 fly with no strobing or colour lights etc? Is it military?

I filmed this tonight 29th March over southern UK at around 2120hrs. Many thanks.

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    $\begingroup$ Could it be a Starlink cluster? $\endgroup$ – CatchAsCatchCan Mar 30 at 1:52
  • $\begingroup$ You were most likely seeing satellites, the weather in the UK has been amazing for satellite viewing over the past week, even in London. If that's the case you're better off asking this in Space.SE. You need to post the direction the satellites were traveling, not just where they appeared from $\endgroup$ – GdD Mar 30 at 7:39
  • $\begingroup$ Since you filmed it, could you post the video online somewhere and share a link to it? That may make it much easier for people to help answer your question. In general, though, unless they're going into combat, aircraft do not fly without navigation & anti-collision lights, no matter the purpose of the flight. $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Apr 1 at 17:02
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Satellites can look like this shortly after a serial deployment from a single launch vehicle.

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