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Why are there two attitude indicators in the cockpit of the Yak-28? Below is a picture from this YouTube video.

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It's possible that the soviet attitude indicators are subject to tumble when operated inverted. the easy way to overcome this is to provide two instruments, one of which does not tumble when flying mostly right-side up and the other does the same for flying upside-down.

Soviet-era acrobatic planes had dual G-meters installed for this same reason. One was installed upside-down and registered negative G's while the other was installed right side-up and registered positive G's.

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  • $\begingroup$ This is an interesting answer but I'm not sure that it's possible to design an attitude indicator that is more prone to tumbling in upright flight than inverted flight, or vice versa. Isn't it a rapid CHANGE in attitude that tends to cause a tumble? If one the indicators was biased toward tumbling in upright flight, wouldn't it likely be already tumbled before the pilot began transitioning to inverted flight? Could be a basis for another ASE question here about exactly what maneuver tends to cause an (older design) attitude indicator to tumble. $\endgroup$ – quiet flyer Mar 20 at 16:06
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Many of the modern military aircraft I have seen have two Attitude Indicators for redundancy. Although, one may be in the HUD. GA aircraft with glass panels certified for IFR also have two for the same reason.

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