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As a part of my project, I am trying to perform structural and aerodynamic analysis of a forward swept wing on an aircraft, specifically the Grumman X-29 (pictured below).

enter image description here

I am assuming that information on the airfoil and wing of the X-29 is proprietary information. So, are there any open source airfoils and wing dimensions (NACA or otherwise) that closely resemble the X-29 wing?

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  • $\begingroup$ Resources location is considered as off topic by the help center. You'd better ask for a specific sub problem yoyr are trying to address, the answers are likely to give you references for further reading $\endgroup$ – Manu H Mar 6 at 11:44
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    $\begingroup$ NASA published an ebook on the X-29: Sweeping Forward. Have you taken a look at it already? $\endgroup$ – Rodrigo de Azevedo Mar 6 at 13:06
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From Mason’s Perspective on the X-29:

The other issue with this airfoil is that every Grumman aerodynamicist felt the need to “improve” it, so that there were many variations. I think the airfoil that was used on the X-29 was known as K-Mod 2. I’m not sure anybody can say with certainty what the actual airfoil coordinates are. Grumman was not good with documentation

The airfoil appears on page 9 of that memo:

X-29 airfoil drawing, from "Computational Aerodynamic Design: X-29, the Gulfstream Series and a Tactical Fighter" by Charles W. Boppe in SAE Transactions, Vol. 94, Section 6 (1985), pp. 424-468

The reference given for it is Boppe, which I assume to mean the article "Computational Aerodynamic Design: X-29, the Gulfstream Series and a Tactical Fighter" by Charles W. Boppe in SAE Transactions, Vol. 94, Section 6 (1985), pp. 424-468.

Supposedly you can access that article in exchange for signing up with the host service, but I'm not willing to try from my current machine.

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