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Can you calculate an aircraft's lateral acceleration from the aircraft's yaw, pitch and roll rates? If so, how?

This is to implement a digital slip indicator.

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm confused. You want to measure lateral acceleration or sideslip? Lateral acceleration can be simply measured by accelerometers, they are cheap enough. $\endgroup$ – JZYL Feb 20 at 21:26
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No. Yaw, pitch and roll rates only describe the change in the orientation or attitude of the object relative to a frame of reference. Is it changing orientation to point further clockwise? or counter clockwise, or upwards/downwards, etc.

Any acceleration is a measure of the change in the velocity of the object relative to the frame of reference in question. An object can be rotating to change it's orientation or attitude in any way completely independently of it's velocity through that frame of reference or how that velocity might be changing.

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No. You can have lateral acceleration with no change in attitude, and thus no yaw, pitch, or roll rates. An example would be a change in the crosswind. If all you have is attitude (i.e. yaw, pitch, and roll angles, with or without their rates), you don't know translational acceleration.

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Yes, but only if you know the aircraft's airspeed and orientation in space, and the rate of change of the slip angle and angle-of-attack. After subtracting these last two variables from the yaw, pitch, and roll rates, the residual values must come from actual changes in the direction of the flight path, and if you know the airspeed, then you know all the accelerations involved in these changes.

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    $\begingroup$ Cool, but why not use GPS or radar? The OP didn't ask "...from angular rates and whatever else you want" ;) $\endgroup$ – Zeus Feb 20 at 23:21

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