1
$\begingroup$

I'm working on a research project regarding the Bell XS-1, which used the NACA 65-110 airfoil. I haven't been able to find any data on this airfoil, and I'm wondering if anyone knows where I could?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Google "NACA 65-110" and the first entry is airfoiltools.

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ But there is not a 65-110 in airfoiltools. That's the issue. $\endgroup$ – MD88Fan Feb 19 at 19:11
  • $\begingroup$ Or is the 64- the same? $\endgroup$ – MD88Fan Feb 19 at 19:15
  • $\begingroup$ No, that's not the same as 65-110. The first digit after the 6 is the distance of the minimum pressure area in tenths of the chord. $\endgroup$ – Fiddlesticks Feb 19 at 20:19
  • $\begingroup$ @MD88Fan Apparently I am unable to read.) Sorry. 64- is similar but not exactly 65-. You didn't state what data you were looking for. Worst case you can download Xfoil (which was used make this database) and generate the 65-, though there is a learning curve. $\endgroup$ – Pilothead Feb 19 at 23:38
0
$\begingroup$

The NACA airfoils are all designated by a math formula, pop in the variables (65-110) and out comes the shape. 4-digit series 5-digit series and the "6" series are the most popular.(all with standard or modified versions) So all you need is the 6 series formula and a spreadsheet.

The 6 series formula produces what are commonly called laminar-flow or critical-flow designs, they tend to avoid sharp changes in pressure. Laminar flow is only achievable with very smooth construction(no rivets or seams) and good clean flight conditions(bugs and dirt cause much more turbulent flow) However the same basic design due to the mild changes in pressure also have mild changes in local flow speed and so they also work well at increasing the critical mach number which is useful for high-speed subsonic aircraft like the 747-8. (as well as controlling the position of the shockwave when it does form)

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.