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The GE90-115b is rated at 513 kN maximum thrust and is often said to have 110,000 shaft horsepower, but I have yet to find any document or specification that backs the claim on horsepower figure.

A comparable engine, the Trent XWB-97 rated at 430 kN and puts out 50,000 shp according to the Rolls-Royce website.

The vast difference in horsepower 50,000 shp vs 110000 shp and not all that huge difference in thrust 430 kN vs 513 kN makes me suspicious if the GE90 actually puts out 110,000 or if this has become a "thing" for the GE90 without being correct. Or, perhaps shaft horsepower and turbine horsepower is not the same?

Does the GE90-115b actually output 110,000 shp?

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  • $\begingroup$ According to the GE website for the GE90-110/115 the engines ran at 127,000lb-thrust at "triple redline conditions" for 60 hours. So what you may be seeing is the difference between "maximum thrust" and "rated thrust". The GE90-110/115 puts out around 74-94,000lb-thrust. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Feb 17 at 16:35
  • $\begingroup$ @RonBeyer so the GE90 is rated at 115,000lb maximum and 94,000 continuous if I understood you correctly? The XWB-97 is rated at 430 kN maximum and 370 kN continuous. But, if we compare maximum numbers and not continuous, that means we're looking at XWB97 with 430 kN vs GE90 with 513, (although 569 kN was achieved once) - but thats only ≈ 80-130 kN difference, compared to the massive 60,000 shaft horsepower difference if we are to believe the articles. $\endgroup$ – Erik Feb 17 at 17:44
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    $\begingroup$ Talking about jet engines in HP really doesn't make much sense, but media likes to do it. Power is forcedistance/time or ForceSpeed. So at 0 speed, you get 0 power. At takeoff speed and full thrust you get around 55,000 HP for GE90-115B, while your thrust actually decreases the faster you go. The actual fan shaft will transfer around 30,000 HP from the LP turbine to the Fan, internal to the engine. $\endgroup$ – OSUZorba Feb 19 at 3:07
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Based on the GE website, where they used a GE90-115B as a power generation unit, called the LM9000. GE cited 65,000 horsepower, which seems to scaled more reasonably when compared to the RB211 XWB

https://www.ge.com/news/reports/ge-oil-gas-just-turned-worlds-largest-jet-engine-65-megawatt-power-plant?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%253A%20gereports%252Ffeed%20%2528GE%20Reports%2529

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I think the numbers (93.7khp) are accurate (https://www.geaviation.com/commercial/engines/ge90-engine).

I recall numbers from CFM56 (smaller engine) being something like 10khp for the fan and 20khp for the core so like 2/3 for the core and 1/3 for the fan (can't find where i saw that, but it was definitly shaft power).

On the Trents it is said 50 khp from "high power turbine blades", so i'm guessing it might be the hp core shaft power which is probably like the CFM, something like 2/3 of total engine power which would put it at 75 khp and GE90 core power around 62.5khp which matches the number given (65 khp) for the LM9000 (core technology similar to that of the GE90).

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