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I am looking for a better way to essentially "mount" the control surfaces from a Boeing 737-747-777-787 and MD-11's. The current process is to just remove them and strap to a table. The issues with this is that it takes a lot of time to remove/inspect and possibly repair. the other issue as the way we are "mounting" them for said inspection. By strapping them to a table they can be bent, dropped, and it just isn't the best idea to have the control surfaces, like an 18 ft aileron, laying on a table...

I am just looking for any advice when it comes to mounting and servicing these parts as well as alternatives to strapping them to a table...

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    $\begingroup$ This is something you should talk to your Boeing service representative about. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Feb 11 '20 at 18:15
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    $\begingroup$ Before you decide to change Boeing official procedures, you really ought to familiarize yourself with the reasons behind the crash of American 191. $\endgroup$ – Harper - Reinstate Monica Feb 11 '20 at 18:17
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    $\begingroup$ The OEM will not provide any guidance for what to do with a control surface once removed, unless there is a Component Maintenance Manual produced by the OEM that may include instructions or specify a holding fixture for the component. $\endgroup$ – John K Feb 11 '20 at 20:05
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Your airline should have proper holding fixtures, basically a wheeled frame that mounts the surface at key attachment points, for control surfaces, either purchased from the manufacturer or designed in house. The table strapping business is probably because the airline is too cheap to get the proper equipment.

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  • $\begingroup$ The Aero MRO company I work for wants to come up with an in house design so we don't have to open a can of worms with Boeing. We have an inboard sling that is used to remove some of these controlled surfaces. $\endgroup$ – Jihad Chahine Feb 12 '20 at 19:09
  • $\begingroup$ I was looking for some advice on handling these control surfaces without having to go to OEM. Although It seems like that's the best (safest) bet. $\endgroup$ – Jihad Chahine Feb 12 '20 at 19:11
  • $\begingroup$ Well the basic advice for moving things around manually is to make sure you have enough people doing the moving. Bad things happen when 2 guys try to move a surface around that should be handled by 4 or 6. It can be done but it just takes more bodies and more planning and care. $\endgroup$ – John K Feb 12 '20 at 19:14

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