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I tried to find the definition of these fuels but I could't.

Does anyone know about company compensation fuel or pad fuel? In which document can I find the definition of these fuels?

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    $\begingroup$ What company are you asking about? Do you work for this company? $\endgroup$ – Michael Hall Feb 7 at 2:33
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    $\begingroup$ Those are probably not common terms and probably relate to only a few companies. $\endgroup$ – Mike Sowsun Feb 7 at 2:36
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, Mike. $\endgroup$ – young Feb 7 at 4:08
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    $\begingroup$ You really need to add more context, otherwise your question might be closed as "unclear" $\endgroup$ – Manu H Feb 7 at 7:02
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Company Compensation Fuel

This is a term, which seems to be used by Korean Air. They define it on their website:

Company Compensation Fuel

fuel to minimize abnormal flight occurred. Based on this, fuel consumption performance is modeled for a certain period of time, and based on this, the amount of fuel repeatedly consumed excessively compared to the flight plan is added.

(koreanair.com, translated by Google)

So this is fuel added based on the airline's experience (hence company) for typical fuel use on a given route.

Pad Fuel

I have never heard this term and Google also does not find anything related to aviation. Is it possible this was a translation? If so, could you add the original term and where you heard about it?

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  • $\begingroup$ "pad fuel" may refer to the fuel added by the PIC above what company dispatch has mandated. The PIC may decide the weather, traffic, etc. may prolong the flight time above what is planned. Thus avoiding draining the mandated reserve fuel. $\endgroup$ – Mike Brass Feb 21 at 10:28
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I suspect the "pad fuel" might refer to conditions where deicing is needed. Time spent on deice pad with engines running leads more fuel consuption than a normal taxi to holding point would.

Since this is an easily indentifiable situation with predictable effect on fuel consumption, it might be that this would be referred to as "Pad fuel".

But: as google comes up with absolutely nothing, I highly doubt my own answer.

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  • $\begingroup$ Good theory, I didn't think about the term deicing pads! $\endgroup$ – Bianfable Feb 7 at 18:58
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While I have no specific knowledge of these terms being used together, my first thought was that "Pad Fuel" would be fuel gotten from the local pad, and "Company Compensation Fuel" would be fuel that you purchase while away and get reimbursed for, or compensated.

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PAD fuel is company specific and typically applies to an abnormal event taking place at or near a predefined point; e.g., ETP during ETOPS.

For example: If a depressurization event were to occur and a subsequent decent commenced, PAD fuel would be that in excess of minimum GO/RETURN fuel to reach facilities named on either side of an ETP under reduced efficiency.

It’s just another dispatch contingency similar to the aforementioned compensation fuel and is used in the same colloquial context as if supplementing or “padding” one’s bank account.

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    $\begingroup$ Hmm... I think reserves for events you describe are already included in the "usual" reserves. I know my own answer is speculative, but can you give any source for your claim? $\endgroup$ – Jpe61 Apr 10 at 11:10
  • $\begingroup$ No. The “usual reserve” you state is regulatory. ETP padding is both discretionary and variable, thus calculated outside of reserve minimums. The definition I provide is per company FOM and may not be shared via open forum. Proprietary rules prevail. Notwithstanding I notice a lot of guesswork here, which has no place in aviation or any academic pursuit. The aforementioned is the answer to the question – take it or leave it. $\endgroup$ – Croix McDougal Apr 14 at 12:08

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