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Given the corner cutting Boeing did with the Max certification, is the FAA allowing the 777X to be certified as a derivative (easier) of the 777 Classic or requiring a new Type Certificate? (harder)

The wings are new, the engines are new, the flight deck is new (from the 787 I understand), the weight is higher and the fuselage longer.

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    $\begingroup$ It'll probably be certed as a 777 derivative, but the key thing is maintaining a common type rating requiring no pilot sim time to convert. That's what drives all of this. Can't say for certain, but in my experience the major factor in achieving a common type rating is a common cockpit with as little variation as possible between variants. A new flight deck makes it certain in my mind that there will have to be a new type rating for crews, even if it's on the same TC. $\endgroup$ – John K Feb 3 '20 at 22:40
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    $\begingroup$ @JohnK B737NG type ratings could be obtained in a B737C sim in the past, followed by some sessions Differences Training in a B737NG sim. $\endgroup$ – Koyovis Feb 3 '20 at 23:08
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    $\begingroup$ @Koyovis My type rating was in the CRJ line, and moving to different models only required a class/CBT session with no sim, even though you'd be going from a hard wing CRJ200 to a slatted, FADEC CRJ700. When the 1000 was brought out, Transport Canada put their foot down and demanded dedicated sim time as well, although it was just a short session including demonstrating you knew how long the thing was by doing a U turn lol. But just the requirement for a little sim was a disaster marketing-wise. $\endgroup$ – John K Feb 3 '20 at 23:18
  • $\begingroup$ Related (general rule, not applicable to each cases, thus not a dupe): How are evolution and variants of aircraft considered by certification authorities? $\endgroup$ – Manu H Feb 4 '20 at 9:07
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Yes, Boeing applied for an amendment to the existing 777 type certificate:

On April 19, 2017 (for the Model 777-8 airplane), and May 12, 2015 (for the 777-9 airplane), Boeing applied for an amendment to Type Certificate (TC) No. T00001SE to include the new Model 777-8 and 777-9 airplanes. These airplanes are constructed with new carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) wings with folding wingtips.

The Model 777-9 airplane, a derivative of the Model 777-300ER airplane currently approved under TC No. T00001SE, is a stretched-fuselage, large, twin-engine airplane with seating for 408 passengers and a maximum takeoff weight of 775,000 pounds.

The Model 777-8 airplane, a shortened-body derivative of the Model 777-9 airplane, is a large, twin-engine airplane with seating for 359 passengers and a maximum takeoff weight of 775,000 pounds.

(federalregister.gov, emphasis mine)

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Boeing claims it shares the 777 type rating and has a common type with the 787, which it says reduces training requirements.

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