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The Phoenix Mesa-Gateway Airport (KIWA) has a named obstacle departure procedure - the Phoenix Departure.

What's the correct phraseology for when clearance assigns it to you? Is it "N123AB, cleared to XXX, via the Phoenix Obstacle Departure"?

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  • $\begingroup$ I bit of trivia about the naming. You may have noticed that departure procedures all have a number associated with them (and most have one or more transitions). You will never find a Phoenix One and a Phoenix Two. Whenever a departure procedure is changed, the number is incremented. It’s quite rare to find one that is still numbered 'One'. At this airport most of them are up to Six and one is Seven. $\endgroup$ – JScarry Jan 6 at 23:35
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Items in parentheses on these charts are not said when referring to them by name. It's the same for other departures/arrivals that are RNAV, and for approaches that may be GPS or RNP.

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This is an Obstacle Departure so this is not assigned by ATC. Some obstacle departures are textual based and some have an image depiction of the departure, such as this one. Part 91 pilots are not required to follow Obstacle Departures under an IFR flight plane but it is highly encouraged. Commercial flights must follow Obstacle Departure procedures and it is up to the pilot in command to seek them out and fly them not for ATC to assign them.

More information on IFR departure procedures can be found here.

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It's called the "Phoenix One Departure", exactly as depicted in the title. Why do you think it would be something else?

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  • $\begingroup$ I think the OP is asking for the clearance phraseology, not just the name of the procedure. $\endgroup$ – Wayne Conrad Jan 6 at 19:49
  • $\begingroup$ It's the same answer either way. (As a general rule we call things by their name...) $\endgroup$ – Michael Hall Jan 6 at 20:46

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