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I have a single engine land commercial without an instrument rating. I am currently completing the instrument rating. Now if I need a single engine and multi engine commercial with instrument ratings, what would be the most cost effective way of going about this?

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  • $\begingroup$ Can we assume you're asking about the US? $\endgroup$ – Pondlife Jan 3 at 16:17
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The cheapest way (I'm talking Canada here) is to do the basic instrument training in the single, then do the multi rating and check ride separately, then the do some practice approaches and emergencies in the twin and multi simulator to prepare for the multi-IFR checkride , and do that. There's no point in doing an SE check ride. When I did it some years ago I bit the bullet and did almost of the air time in a Seminole because I was uncomfortable with going into a multi-IFR checkride with maybe only 15 hours in the twin, and the kind of sims available today didn't exist.

Go to a school that has one of those Red Bird motion simulators or equivalent and take maximum advantage of the portion of the training that can be in a sim. That'll save a ton of money.

Also use MS Flight Sim or Xplane to practice practice practice at home. It is a very powerful tool if used properly. By "properly" I man make sure the stuff you practice on your own is being correctly done, and are not reinforcing incorrect stuff.

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  • $\begingroup$ Oops I got caught out assuming US rules were similar to Canadian ones again. Yes, my description is based on Canadian rules where there are 3 instrument rating groups, 1 (multi), 2 (multi-centerline thrust) and 3 (single), and for a 1 you have to do the checkride in a twin. Good catch. Thanks. $\endgroup$ – John K Jan 4 at 2:12
  • $\begingroup$ So how would Transport Canada go about converting someone who holds a CPL ASEL, AMEL & IA to the equivalent in Canada? $\endgroup$ – Carlo Felicione Jan 4 at 3:46
  • $\begingroup$ Not sure. If it's just a paperwork exercise, I think it would be no issue to get a Group 1 if you have an FAA instrument rating and an FAA multi rating together. If a checkride is required however, you would have to do it in a twin to make it a Group 1. $\endgroup$ – John K Jan 4 at 5:20

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