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After the recent EASA airworthiness directive concerning the potential for weight and balance problems with the A320neo, Lufthansa announced it would no longer sell seats on the back row of those aircraft. What are the financial implications for airlines of not being able to fill an aircraft?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure what you mean by "implications"? They don't sell them, so they don't get the # of seats * expected revenue for each flight. Can you specify exactly what you are looking for? $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Sep 26 at 12:01
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    $\begingroup$ @RonBeyer I guess the question boils down to how often were Lufthansa's A320neos full enough to actually need the last 6 seats on the aircraft. $\endgroup$ – Bianfable Sep 26 at 12:36
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    $\begingroup$ @Ron Beyer - Financial implications = How much will airlines lose because they aren't going to sell those seats? $\endgroup$ – Dave Gremlin Sep 26 at 14:00
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Not being able to sell seats on the last row would (in Lufthansa's case) theoretically mean a 3.3% loss of revenue: LH setup for A320neo is 180 seats, 6 seats in last row.

But, only theoretically, because seat occupancy rate for Lufthansa Group was 81.4% (2018). It is very unlikely that all of the flights operated with A320neo would fly 100% fully booked. In a non fully booked flight, the last row would obviously be the first one to be left empty. The actual loss of revenue would be way less than 3.3%, but how much, it is impossible to say.

Anecdotally I'd say that it is a blessing the last row is out of service for now, this Business Traveller article will give you an idea why: no window, seats do not recline, legroom is smaller...

World Airline News: Lufthansa Group becomes the largest airline group in Europe with 142 million passengers in 2018

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    $\begingroup$ Airlines, especially the biggies, usually have performance guarantees and AD clauses in their sales contracts that usually force the OEM to eat the financial hit, so they will be getting compensated by Airbus in any case. $\endgroup$ – John K Sep 26 at 13:16
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    $\begingroup$ Keep in mind that self-loading cargo is only part of what an aircraft carries, removing half a dozen passengers worth of weight means that there is more weight available for other cargo. $\endgroup$ – ratchet freak Sep 26 at 13:16
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    $\begingroup$ Excellent answer, +1 and 'accepted'. I am a bit surprised at those levels of occupancy since I've seen quite a few flights overbooked and been bumped off them myself a couple of times $\endgroup$ – Dave Gremlin Oct 2 at 15:55

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