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This question already has an answer here:

I'm flying from Costa Rica to Chile in November with a B737-800 plane. I'm wondering if this is a different aircraft than the B737 Max 8 or if it's the same?

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marked as duplicate by a CVn, Pondlife, GdD, DeltaLima, Gerry Sep 19 at 16:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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All B737 Max, as of today 19-Sept-2019, are still grounded and will be for the foreseeable future. So if you are flying in an aircraft, you are guaranteed that it will not be one of those.

As for the underlying question "is it safe to fly in airplane model "X"?" the answer always is that if authorities are allowing it to fly, it is safe to the best of our knowledge.

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Yes, it is a different generation of the 737.

The Boeing 737 currently exists in its 4th generation:

  • Original Series: The first generation first flew in 1967 and consists of the 737-100 and 737-200 models, which differ in fuselage length.
  • Classic Series: The Classic first flew in 1984 and the main difference is the use of high bypass turbofan engines. It consists of 3 different length variants: 737-300/-400/-500.
  • Next Generation (NG) Series: The NG first flew in 1997 and consists of 4 different length variants: 737-600/-700/-800/-900. The aircraft you will fly on is from this series, as are most 737s, which are still in use today.
  • MAX Series: The MAX first flew in 2016 and also consists of 4 different length variants: 737 MAX 7, MAX 8, MAX 9 and MAX 10. As Federico said, all variants of this series are currently grounded because of problems with the newly introduced MCAS.
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The 737-800 is not affected by the issues grounding the 737 MAX because the incriminated system (MCAS) does not exist on it.
The 737-800 is part of Boeing's "Next Generation" series.
The 737 Max is much more recent.

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    $\begingroup$ A note for the OP: The MAX being "much more recent" does not incriminate the NG series in any way as being old, out-of-date or in any other way unsafe. There are 1000s of NG series aircraft flying with airlines around the world on a daily basis. $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Sep 19 at 13:32

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