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Can you please explain aircraft spin in simple non-mathematical terms?

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    $\begingroup$ Hi Deepak. Can you show us the mathematical explanation and tell us what is unclear so we can know where to begin? $\endgroup$ – ymb1 Aug 31 '19 at 13:58
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    $\begingroup$ Or better yet, just describe what you think you understand about spin and if possible what aspects don’t make sense. $\endgroup$ – Paul Aug 31 '19 at 15:41
  • $\begingroup$ Please rephrase your question to meet the quality standard as explained in the help center. For example, you can read how it flies?, and then come back to precise what part of the spin mechanism you don't understand. $\endgroup$ – Manu H Aug 31 '19 at 19:33
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    $\begingroup$ Honestly I am almost at a loss for words here regarding the comments above. While for the mathematically inclined equations can be useful in enhancing understanding, for others they can be an obstacle. It really isn't that difficult to share basic knowledge about advanced concepts with others who may not have an engineering or math degree. That's all the OP is asking for. Unclear?! If you are really that confused about how to answer, take a look at below. Maybe not perfect, but a pretty solid layman's answer to a very simple question if you ask me. $\endgroup$ – Michael Hall Aug 31 '19 at 21:11
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    $\begingroup$ Explanation of spin mechanism without maths exists on internet. I agree they are not all clear, and thus question is useful. Yet, asked as is, it may show a lack of basic research. A better way to ask this question may be a link to one of the explanation highlighting the unclear parts. $\endgroup$ – Manu H Sep 1 '19 at 13:29
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A spin is a kind of aggravated stall in which one wing becomes more stalled than the other one. This imbalance in lift results in an autorotative motion abound a vertical axis, generally passing through the inboard wing of the aircraft. Spins can be initiated be stalling the airplane in a uncoordinated turn, which causes the inboard wing to enter a deeper stall than the outboard wing. An airplane must always 1) be in an aerodynamic stall in 2) uncoordinated flight in order to enter a spin.

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The simplest answer may be: An airplane spins as a result of being uncoordinated when a stall occurs. Uncoordinated means the nose and tail of the airplane are not inline with the flight path. So if the airplane is moving in one direction, but the airplane is pointing in another direction, then it is likely to spin in the event of a stall. That is the simple explanation. The deeper life saving explanation is contained in the video linked here. This video explains common false notions about how an airplane works that can cause a pilot to stall and spin his or her airplane. Understanding these can help keep you safe when flying. Covered is the skidded turn which is the most common cause of spins. There is some math on how to calculate stall speed for various bank angles, but you can just skip over it if you are not interested. Please let me know if you have questions after watching.
Thanks, John

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