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This Biplane from the 1930's is from an English Airshow. Can anyone identify it?

There is now another picture.

enter image description here

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Now that we have established that it is a Gloster Gauntlet from the No 19 Sqn of the RAF, can we determine the airshow? My guess is the Empire Air Day of 1935, 1936, 1937 or maybe 1938. Location: RAF Duxford. @PhilS do you have any information regarding year or location? $\endgroup$ – DeltaLima Aug 14 at 21:12
  • $\begingroup$ Unfortunately I am unable to provide any further information as my father passed some time ago. In the 1930's he lived in Cambridge, which would make Duxford spot on! As fate would have it he served in the RAF from 1940-45. I really wish I had asked him questions about these pics when he was around. $\endgroup$ – Phil S Aug 15 at 15:56
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Maybe it is one step before the Gladiator: The Gloster Gauntlet. Here the number of wing struts and the landing gear are a better match.

Gloster Gauntlet

Gloster Gauntlet (picture source)

It must be noted that a lot of experimentation went on with those aircraft. The one in the picture above has guns added on both wings which made the aircraft too heavy and were removed later.

The type in your picture clearly has a different engine with a smaller and deeper NACA cowling - maybe it was used for testing the Bristol Mercury engine of the Gladiator.

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  • $\begingroup$ To my eye, it looks like the unknown has more wing ahead and behind the struts, larger wheels on simpler-looking main gear legs. There were a lot of rather similar radial-engine biplanes from the 1930s... $\endgroup$ – Zeiss Ikon Aug 12 at 22:55
  • $\begingroup$ @ZeissIkon The wheels look indeed larger. With the struts I don't agree. Wing planform, dihedral and all that look very similar if not identical. $\endgroup$ – Peter Kämpf Aug 13 at 12:59
  • $\begingroup$ Of course, there is the different engine cowl, too. The Gauntlet has almost a speed ring, while the question aircraft has a longer cowling. In those days, that might have been a running change (aircraft built a year or two apart). $\endgroup$ – Zeiss Ikon Aug 13 at 13:11
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    $\begingroup$ You are absolutely right Peter. I've changed the contrast of the picture of the unknown aircraft a bit, and the tail is clearly checkered and seems to have a K with four numbers below. This picuture shows the Gauntlets of the No 19 Sqn of the RAF, showing exactly the same colours as the picture of the unknown aircraft. It's a Gloster Gauntlet Mk1 $\endgroup$ – DeltaLima Aug 14 at 20:28
  • $\begingroup$ @DeltaLima Wow, thank you! Excellent detective work! I noticed the numbers but did not do the work of making them legible. $\endgroup$ – Peter Kämpf Aug 14 at 20:58
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Maybe the Gloster Gladiator but possibly not:

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Why possibly not? What are the visible differences? $\endgroup$ – ymb1 Aug 12 at 21:55
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    $\begingroup$ Main visual difference appears to be that the Gladiator has one pair of wing to wing vertical struts on each side, while the Question Image shows two pairs per wing. $\endgroup$ – TheLuckless Aug 12 at 21:58
  • $\begingroup$ also the landing gear has more struts in the question photo. But the Gladiator is close! $\endgroup$ – Peter Kämpf Aug 12 at 22:10

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