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In modern aircraft is lift only generated by wings or can other parts of fuselage generate a significant amount as well, to the point it needs to be accounted for when designing a plane?

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The fuselage, and any other surfaces that air is flowing over, will contribute to lift. This was one of my interview questions when I joined Airbus in 2003!

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  • $\begingroup$ To be picky, the word lift is normally used to refer to that portion of the total aerodynamic forces generated by a specified airfoil, (normally the main wing), which is normal (perpendicular), to the flight path. (the portion which is parallel top the flight is referred to as Drag). The atmosphere is pressing on every single point on the surface of the aircraft, and generating a corresponding aerodynamic force at that point which is normal to the surface at that point, so this question is more a matter of semantics or definition than it is of physics. $\endgroup$ – Charles Bretana Jul 31 '19 at 18:59

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