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I just saw G-YMML (operating as BA 199) execute a missed approach and make weird circles. What is happening here? (FlightAware permalink)

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    $\begingroup$ thebasource.com/… says it eventually diverted to Hyderabad, then flew to Mumbai later. But it does not state the reason. Trawling the site of DCGA or AIB might return something more, but it's harder to search. $\endgroup$
    – Jan Hudec
    Dec 7, 2021 at 15:49

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Perhaps the aircraft went missed approach because of an unsafe gear indication or flight control issue and the crew wanted to try and rectify or troubleshoot the issue and was given that general area east of the airport and away from the normal traffic flow to work the problem (doing 360 turns in process).

Difficult to say for certain.

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  • $\begingroup$ I have the same comment as for the deleted answers—those 360s look a little too perfect compared to their movement across the ground, if wind was the only reason they didn't stay over the same spot. So why would they move across the ground, if not wind? $\endgroup$
    – randomhead
    Dec 7, 2021 at 0:18
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    $\begingroup$ The map clearly shows they did not just depart, so it's down to the second option. It's obviously hard to tell what exactly they were troubleshooting. $\endgroup$
    – Jan Hudec
    Dec 7, 2021 at 8:50
  • $\begingroup$ @randomhead -- re the issue of the shape of the circles, and the comment under the deleted question that they "all look pretty circle-y" -- I guess I don't agree-- the mere fact that they are not completely staying in the same place on the trace, is proof that they are not round, but rather have a longer downwind leg and a shorter upwind leg. Of course, the wind is clearly only a small fraction of the aircraft flight speed, otherwise the "circles" would be much more stretched out into a series of non-round "curlicues". $\endgroup$ Jan 6, 2022 at 18:24
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    $\begingroup$ Anyway, to me they seem consistent w/ an aircraft maintaining a constant bank angle (likely by autopilot) and aspd, in a steady (light) wind. Just had another thought-- would be interesting to go back and check the reported wind conditions, though surface winds might have been too light to give much insight-- $\endgroup$ Jan 6, 2022 at 18:24
  • $\begingroup$ @quietflyer Agreed; this is exactly what you’d get flying constant-bank circles without correcting for wind. I’m curious why ATC didn’t give them holding instructions, though. $\endgroup$
    – StephenS
    Jan 6, 2022 at 18:49

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