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I have a question regarding this requirement as I work on my IFR SEL rating:

Forty hours of actual or simulated instrument time in the areas of operation listed in paragraph (c) of this section, of which 15 hours must have been received from an authorized instructor who holds an instrument-airplane rating, and the instrument time includes [...]

The question is, if 15 hours of the 40 hours is required to be with an authorized instrument rated instructor, then how do you gain the other 25 hours of the required 40 hours? Wouldn’t all 40 hours have to be with an instrument rated certified instructor?

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Av.SE $\endgroup$ – Ralph J Jun 29 '19 at 11:57
  • $\begingroup$ Opinions differ on whether it is a good idea to fly without an instructor, but I think that after you have mastered the instrument scan, power settings and sppeds, reading the approach plates, and talking with ATC the instructor is basically acting as a safety pilot. Flying with another instrument student would allow both of you to learn at the same time. It is helpful to me to watch other pilots fly IFR and it may be useful to you too. If I was to do my IFR over, I’d set up a GoPro in the cabin and review my flights. $\endgroup$ – JScarry Jun 29 '19 at 14:53
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If you're under the hood in VMC + VFR, you could have an appropriately rated pilot (i.e. PPL) in the other seat as the safety pilot. If the other pilot is instrument rated (but not a CFII) + is the PIC for the flight, you could even be the sole manipulator of the controls in IMC + IFR, although that gets into the questions about logging PIC vs acting as PIC, which is its own set of issues. The "safety pilot" option is probably more typical.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you Ralph! That does make sense, and that information helps! $\endgroup$ – Ken Jun 29 '19 at 12:15

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