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Professional pilot logbooks (either paper or electronic) always seem to be more elaborate than those used by private pilots.

I am curious as to what a professional pilot finds important to track in their logbooks besides just total flight time in aircraft type.

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  • $\begingroup$ This question seems quite broad. At least in the US, there are various 'types' of time that are defined by regulation and you need them for specific qualifications. But when it comes to getting a job, employers and insurers can add their own requirements that may be much more specific. If you can narrow down your question somehow that would be helpful. $\endgroup$
    – Pondlife
    Jun 2 '19 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ @Pondlife hopefully my edit makes the question more specific. Thanks for the feedback. $\endgroup$
    – Aeyrium
    Jun 2 '19 at 22:00
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The experience required is simply flying hours on the type or configuration, and flying hours, for pilot logging purposes, is time from engine start to engine shutdown. If you're flying an airplane with a Hobbs, which usually starts/stops using oil pressure, you can just use the Hobbs value. If no Hobbs, record the engine start/stop time yourself and use that, or if you forgot to, just use the tachometer hours reading (which is closer to air time, or time airborne) and add a 10th.

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  • $\begingroup$ Besides time in type or configuration, do commercial pilots keep track of time flying IFR / IMC, or Night hours, or for example, number/type of Instrument Approaches? $\endgroup$
    – Aeyrium
    Jun 2 '19 at 21:53
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, where it matters. In any pilot log book, there's a column for night, IFR, multi, sea, etc. Whatever is applicable you enter the same number as under P1/P2. There is usually a "Remarks" box for bits of data beyond hours. For something like flying approaches where it's necessary for currency, you wld notate "4 ILS inst approaches flown" or similar. But for routine ops where the number of procedures is not material to anything, you don't have to. Normally you just jot down something short that summarizes the trip like Night CC Kxxx to Kxxx" or "stall practice", or something like that. $\endgroup$
    – John K
    Jun 2 '19 at 22:51

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