0
$\begingroup$

As the title says, what endorsements and licenses do I need to achieve before I can legally fly a decommissioned single seater fighter jet or trainer jet (like a L-39 Albatros or even a F22 when the time comes)

Simply assume I could afford everything the jet needs and the jet itself, I am aware that a lot of jets (mostly newer) will never see civilian pilots.

Edit: This question could not be answered without a country. I am mostly asking for the Netherlands / EU, but I am interested in American laws aswell, if there are big differences.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Without knowing in which country you want to obtain permission to fly such an aircraft it is not possible to answer. $\endgroup$ – Juan Jimenez May 27 at 10:00
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for pointing that out @JuanJimenez I edited the question $\endgroup$ – Martijn Vissers May 27 at 10:23
  • $\begingroup$ These days, the US is very sensitive about letting warplanes -- and especially advanced ones -- get into the hands of anybody who isn't the military of a close ally. I'd be very surprised if any F-22s fly after the USAF is done with them. $\endgroup$ – David Richerby May 27 at 10:52
  • $\begingroup$ I'd be suprised too if that were to ever happen so what thats concerned its a theoretical question, but a "old" military / military trainer sure is possible to get it seems $\endgroup$ – Martijn Vissers May 27 at 11:25
  • $\begingroup$ You can buy and fly something as advanced as a MIG-29 or a Harrier these days. But flying it will cost you a lot more money than buying it. If you can legally buy it, the FAA will let you fly it as long as you can find a qualified instructor to sign you off. For some types of ex-military jets, finding that instructor is the biggest catch. $\endgroup$ – Juan Jimenez May 27 at 11:41
0
$\begingroup$

In the US the minimum requirements for a warbird type rating are a private pilot’s license, current medical and 500 hours total time in a fixed wing aircraft. The training requirements include ground and flight training and vary depending on the aircraft. You also need to do the usual Bi-Annual Flight Review (BFR), and your insurance company will also likely impose requirements for coverage, such as currency, etc. I don't know the requirements in the EU, but they probably vary from country to country.

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Do you have any sources for this? Someone in the comments and my own research haven't said anything about 500h and bfr's. $\endgroup$ – Martijn Vissers May 27 at 11:52
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ You can check the various training outfits, such as this one: easternblocaircraft.com/jet.html. Everyone has to do BFR's, that's a requirement for all US-licensed pilots. $\endgroup$ – Juan Jimenez May 27 at 12:01
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Aside from licensing requirements, you would only (probably) get an exhibition certificate for the aircraft, which means you aren't taking it out on weekends to impress the ladies, you can only fly it to/from a specific list of shows or for training purposes. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer May 28 at 2:31
  • $\begingroup$ @RonBeyer I'm not so sure. You can almost certainly get it registered as an experimental and fly it to your heart's content, as long as it fits in the traffic pattern (think noise restrictions for example). $\endgroup$ – jwenting May 28 at 4:08
  • $\begingroup$ @jwenting Ron is correct. Warbirds almost always get experimental exhibition-only airworthiness certificates with severely restricted operating limitations stating what they can be used for. The exceptions are, for example, a handful of P-51's that have standard airworthiness certificates. I'd almost kill to get one of those, if I had the money. :) $\endgroup$ – Juan Jimenez May 28 at 8:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.