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I have come across certain unmanned airstrips where only VFR flight is allowed not IFR? I wonder what can be the possible reasons for that?

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you give us an example of an airstrip, and tell us exactly what it means that IFR isn't allowed? Where did you read that? Also, are you asking about regulations in a specific country, or is this a general question? $\endgroup$
    – Pondlife
    May 17, 2019 at 16:44

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Two reasons:

1) It takes time and money to create an instrument approach procedure, and possibly not enough people have requested that one has been created.

2) A certain amount of obstacle clearance is required, if for some reason the required safety cannot be guaranteed using instruments, the FAA can simply not create a IFR approach

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't ususally like changing the words of others, but I made a minor edit because based on the way the question was asked I couldn't be confident that the OP would understand what it was you were refering to in #1 above. $\endgroup$ May 16, 2019 at 23:52
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I’d have to examine the specific airport, but you are required to have an approved instrument approach procedure, with current weather minimums above the published minimums, in order to approach and land at an airport when the weather is below VFR minimums for the airspace the airport is in.

Some airports also have terrain and other nearby obstacles which may make it hazardous to takeoff and land from in marginal weather or at night. Check the Chart Supplement for that region for further details.

This does not prohibit flying out to that airport under IFR, though. But the local weather at the airport must facilitate the ability to descend from the MEA and make an approach and landing under basic VFR. Ref §91.169 (c)(2)

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Instrument approach relies on beacons and transmitters on the ground like VOR/DME or ILS. That's unlikely to be in place. Furthermore, even if this was in place, a manned tower would be needed for ground movements in IMC conditions, to avoid runway incursions.

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    $\begingroup$ At least in the US, plenty of instrument approaches are GPS-only, with no ground transmitters at all. And many non-towered airports have instrument approaches. $\endgroup$
    – Pondlife
    May 17, 2019 at 16:42

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