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The Concorde had a pair of dark-coloured hexagons under each of its forward boarding doors, as seen in this picture (showing the hexagons on the left side of the Concorde's neck):

enter image description here
British Airways Concorde, Pictured by LondonAirTravel at the BA Engineering Base, London Heathrow (link)

What are they, and what purpose do they serve? They obviously aren't passenger or crew windows, and they're far too big to be static ports yet far too small to be cargo doors - some sort of maintenance access panel, maybe?

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enter image description here (source)

This is the side loading door. Under this door are the static pressure panels that provide data to the Air Data Computers. They have been painted over now.

Here is a nice close up image

enter image description here

(source)

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    $\begingroup$ I think the first image you posted is the opposite side of the aircraft that these are on, I don't think they were painted over (at least not on the right side). The second image seems to be missing the lower door you see in the first one. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer May 2 at 2:35
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    $\begingroup$ The first picture looks like it has the covers installed or possibly the original components have been removed and stored and a replacement panel affixed. More like the second option as covers would be brightly marked and/or flagged 'removed before flight'. $\endgroup$ – Anilv May 2 at 2:49
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    $\begingroup$ @RonBeyer I would imagine there were redundant sensors on either side of the aircraft as is typically the case. Im also not sure if the first and second picture are of the same airframe. $\endgroup$ – Dave May 2 at 13:15
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    $\begingroup$ In the Concorde ITVV DVD, they are indeed explained as static ports, and yes there is a set on each side. $\endgroup$ – ymb1 May 2 at 13:45
  • $\begingroup$ So I was half right; they are much too big to be the static ports themselves - but not too big to be the panels that the static ports are mounted on! $\endgroup$ – Sean May 4 at 20:52

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