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Is anyone working on differential GPS approaches for seaplanes? They are a largely ignored resource with great capabilities for certain remote places

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    $\begingroup$ Given that getting into the water often means descending below terrain, and that fog likes to stay on the water longer than on land, I doubt that there will be any kind of RNAV approaches published for water. There are very few towered water airports in the world (and yes there are a couple). There's just not a good way to make sure that nobody or nothing is in the way. $\endgroup$
    – Ron Beyer
    Commented Apr 29, 2019 at 14:46
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    $\begingroup$ They already exist. See M57, for example. $\endgroup$
    – user71659
    Commented Apr 29, 2019 at 21:05

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Yes, such plans exist. The Aarhus Harbour Seaport (ICAO code: EKAC) is planning to implement an RNAV approach to allow seaplanes to land in conditions below normal VMC, however, the authorities have yet to approve it.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks! Isn’t RNAV based on VOR technology? The other issue of course is the water state, the wrong wave frequency can be quite dangerous $\endgroup$
    – Guyfacey
    Commented Apr 30, 2019 at 11:31
  • $\begingroup$ @Guyfacey Well RNAV can actually be based on several different types of navigation, but when RNAV is used for approach (as opposed to en-route navigation) it is usually (including in this case) based on GNSS $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 30, 2019 at 13:36

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