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enter image description here

Why does V165 have two distinct MEAs which vary by a large factor (apart from the 180$^{\circ}$ rule of altitudes) considering they would be clearing the same obstacles and receiving signals from the same NAV aids?

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  • $\begingroup$ Please refer IFR chart containing V165 $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 28, 2019 at 6:46
  • $\begingroup$ If you are jetting along in a certain direction, there might be a big mountain ahead of you. but if you are tooling along in the opposite direction the mountain will be behind you. This difference is called out to you so you will be safely boring holes in air instead of granite. $\endgroup$
    – Mike Brass
    Commented Apr 28, 2019 at 7:39
  • $\begingroup$ If the obstacle is at the midpoint of the route wouldn't the aircraft have to clear it by the same altitude $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 28, 2019 at 17:28
  • $\begingroup$ @DarshanPatil - Welcome to Aviation! I've added a chart snippet to your question and changed the question slightly to refer to it. If that's not what you intended, please feel free to edit. $\endgroup$
    – Steve V.
    Commented Apr 28, 2019 at 17:36
  • $\begingroup$ That's great I appreciate it , I was unable to upload the picture myself . Thank you @ Steve V $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 28, 2019 at 18:37

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The most likely reason is terrain. Here's what the VFR sectional looks like:

enter image description here

You can see that the terrain rises sharply to over 3000' close to WINLO intersection, which is too high to provide IFR obstacle clearance (1000', or 2000' over mountainous areas) at an MEA of 4000'. An aircraft flying south on V165 would need to be well above the terrain before reaching WINLO, whereas one flying north from WINLO can use a lower altitude.

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