3
$\begingroup$

Recently I got an offer to work during the incoming summer as survey pilot, but since I do not have the required hours for insurance I can not be the PIC on left seat. So they proposed to be on the right seat until getting enough experience and then switch on. Can I sign those hours on the right if the aircraft is certify for single pilot operation? How?

$\endgroup$
8
  • $\begingroup$ This is a legal question. You cannot expect reliable answers for that here, only personal opinions. $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 17, 2019 at 18:29
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @TimothyTruckle questions about regulations are on topic here, such as What are the requirements for logging SIC time? (FAA) $\endgroup$
    – fooot
    Commented Apr 17, 2019 at 19:18
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Also, I noticed you tagged "EASA regulations" so I assume that you don't care what the FAA has to say about the matter. Is that correct? $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 17, 2019 at 19:18
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Well, I am going to work in Europe under EASA rules, for that reasons I tagged EASA regulations. But if you got some info for FAA as well could be interesting to share some light. $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 18, 2019 at 6:33
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Are you asking if a) you can fly from the right seat with another pilot in the left seat, or b) fly solo from the right seat? $\endgroup$
    – Pondlife
    Commented Apr 20, 2019 at 17:48

1 Answer 1

1
$\begingroup$

I am not sure about EASA regulations but in the US you can log PIC time whenever you are the sole manipulator of the controls and properly rated to fly the aircraft. In the US there is a distinction between the legal PIC (person legally responsible for the flight) and PIC time which is the person actually flying the airplane. Since the plane is certified for only single pilot operations you can only log PIC time not SIC time and only when you are the sole manipulator of the controls. The FAA regulations for logging time can be found in FAR 61.51.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .