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I have been wondering if it is possible to do flight lessons in different locations? For example, I am currently taking my PPL lessons (VRF) in Manchester, UK. I usually travel between countries in Europe and America.

I was wondering if my travels take longer than 2 weeks if it was also possible to take the opportunity to do a lesson in one of them? Or if regulations would made it impossible to do so?

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  • $\begingroup$ You might be able to book some one-off lessons in the USA that don't count toward your EASA PPL. You might have TSA issues though. Also, I've found that instructors can have very different views of things and there might be inconsistencies (quite apart from different procedures, radio rules etc.) $\endgroup$ – Dave Gremlin Mar 24 at 16:22
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As a practical matter, it will probably be too much hassle to get signed up with new flight schools in each city/country you visit for only one or two lessons, especially in the US where you need certain classes of visa (no VWP), permission from DHS, etc.

Also, FAA and ICAO/EASA rules can be pretty different. If you know one well, you can fairly easily learn the other (or just muddle along without anyone noticing), but I wouldn't want to mix the two during primary training. Learning one set of rules is hard enough.

The only case where this might make sense is if you'll be visiting the same city repeatedly and can get the same instructor every time, which eliminates most of the overhead. I did this (both cities in US), and my home instructor would give me a specific list of things to work on for each trip, and when I came back, I'd show what I'd learned and we'd move on to the next thing. After I soloed at home, I did a mock checkride for my other instructor and he soloed me too. Having two instructors did cost me more in total flight time, but it minimized calendar time because instead of losing proficiency by having long gaps between lessons, I was gaining proficiency by flying regularly. It also helped that the two had different teaching styles, so if one wasn't getting through to me, the other would. Still, I wouldn't recommend it if there's any other option

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  • $\begingroup$ is always refreshing to read the so many different stories/experiences people have! Thank you for sharing this ^^ $\endgroup$ – Diogo Santo Mar 25 at 12:11
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This is an answer based on experience, if someone knows corresponding regulations or if I’m writing something not 100% correct, feel free to edit it.

First of all: It’s possible to switch flight schools between countries (what I did).

But regarding doing it while traveling: it depends on which countries and the flight schools. In Germany for example you have to be registered at the authorities in order to get flight lessons and that’s as far as I know exclusive (it’s only possible if you’re not registered somewhere else) but I might be wrong there. I’m not aware of any EASA regulations that prevent it.

The most practical answer for you is probably to check with both your flight schools and those at your travel destinations, if they think, something is possible.

Edit: this just applies to other EASA countries. I don’t think you will have chances outside EASA countries except for if you have ATOs there that are approved as EASA-ATOs.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you @Florian, for sharing this! :) $\endgroup$ – Diogo Santo Mar 25 at 12:10

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