1
$\begingroup$

I am flying a PA-28-180 but have been unable to find where inside the pitot mast the heating elements would be.

I would like to know this to verify my assumption it does not work in the airplane I am flying. The Pitot-heat has been on for about 40 minutes while flying through 5C weather, upon landing I checked if it was at least warm and it was not.

Can anyone verify or reference me some documentation of where and if you would be able to feel the heater?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I also fly a PA-28-180 but I don't have Pitot heat on it. I am thinking that this is an after market add on for your particular plane which means there will be no documentation for it in the POH or parts manual. There should be documentation in the maintenance logs about the installation of the Pitot heat element. Did you check those? $\endgroup$ – DLH Mar 20 '19 at 21:35
  • $\begingroup$ I did not think that far ahead, the owner did not notify me it was an aftermarket upgrade (not sure if he knows). the POH does show pitot heat. I will definitely also check the maintenance logs. $\endgroup$ – brian Mar 20 '19 at 23:19
1
$\begingroup$

You don't actually need to get into the mast to know if the pitot heat is working. I fly a PA-28 and during your preflight check if you engage the pitot heat and allow it to run for a minute or two the pitot tube should be warm to the touch. If it is not your pitot heat is not working (or is not reliable enough for flight).

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah I figured, thanks! I just really didn't know if it was 'feel-able', like in a pitot tube. I will notify the owner appropriately! thanks Dave! $\endgroup$ – brian Mar 20 '19 at 23:17
  • $\begingroup$ It's super hot. I got 2nd degree burns on my palm from gripping a heated tube on a 310. It was a hot VFR summer day...I have no idea why the pilots were using pitot heat. If the Piper elements are anything like Cessna's, only about 30 seconds of run time is needed to warm the mast. $\endgroup$ – acpilot Mar 20 '19 at 23:30
  • $\begingroup$ To check a pitot heat, you DO NOT grip it with your palm and fingers - they'll burn onto the probe/mast. - Just stroke the probe/mast with the BACK of your hand/fingers, and you'll feel the heat without damaging your hand. $\endgroup$ – RAC Mar 21 '19 at 10:24

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.