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Obviously inspired by the current 737 Max situation, what is the longest period of time that any individual type of airliner has been grounded for safety concerns (excluding those that never returned to service)?

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    $\begingroup$ I think that the de Havilland Comet was permanently removed from service after catastrophic pressurization failures. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Comet $\endgroup$ – JScarry Mar 13 at 22:57
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    $\begingroup$ @JScarry: Not quite - several military Comet 1s were rebuilt with stronger fuselages and returned to service (although none of the commercial ones), and the Comet returned to commercial passenger service in 1958 with the Comet 4, which had the bad luck that the bigger, more capable 707 entered service just a few weeks later. $\endgroup$ – Sean Mar 13 at 23:00
  • $\begingroup$ @Sean If you rebuild them, does it count as the same aircraft :) $\endgroup$ – JScarry Mar 13 at 23:05
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    $\begingroup$ @JScarry: According to the regulators, it does. $\endgroup$ – Sean Mar 13 at 23:07
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    $\begingroup$ Possibly of interest: news.aviation-safety.net/2019/03/14/… $\endgroup$ – zenzelezz Mar 15 at 7:09
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The Yak-42 was grounded from June 1982 to October 1984 (26 months) for a cause similar to Alaska Airlines Flight 261.

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    $\begingroup$ That was from 28 June 1982 to October 1984, according to Wikipedia. $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Sep 3 at 20:06
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After the crash of Air France 4590 (July 2000), the Concorde was grounded until November 2001 (same link) - 16 months.

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The Boeing 787 was grounded from January 17, 2013 to April 26, 2013 due to lithium ion battery problems. I think this may be the longest a commercial airliner has been grounded but I am not sure if there is a military plane that was grounded for longer.

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    $\begingroup$ technically it wasn't grounded. The AD stated it was required to undergo specific modifications before being allowed to fly, modifications which weren't available at the time. But there was no AD forbidding the operation of the aircraft. $\endgroup$ – jwenting Mar 14 at 5:05

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