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On August 27, 1992, 3 people were killed when a de Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou crashed immediately after takeoff at Gimli Industrial Park Airport.

Wikipedia describes the accident as follows:

Three people were killed on August 27, 1992 when a NewCal Aviation turbine-modified de Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou they were aboard crashed on the airfield during climb-out after a short take-off from the airport. The aircraft nosed sharply up, arced right and nosed into the ground. […] The cause was listed as failure to deactivate the plane's gust-lock control in the cockpit, […] [T]he Transportation Safety Board of Canada has no record of this incident.

The entire flight was captured on a video which has circulated on the Internet.

Was this accident ever officially investigated? If not, why not?

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    $\begingroup$ It may have been (and probably was) investigated by the Canadian TSB, but the report is probably not available online as it was during the time that they were "digitizing" reports. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Mar 7 '19 at 19:43
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    $\begingroup$ The online report database is supposed to cover 1991 and later incidents, but this particular report is not there. The mystery is how they were able to take off with the gust lock engaged, since on the Bou and the Buff (same flight deck) the gust lock T handle latches engaged when pulled aft and it blocks the throttles from being moved out of idle. $\endgroup$ – John K Mar 8 '19 at 6:39
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It was, but from what I can tell the report has not been digitized yet.

The gust locks were left installed. The aircraft was being operated in the restricted category as they were retrofitting with the PT-6’s.

Here’s an analysis from James Donnelly, Bombardier Aerospace. Starts on page 7.

http://www.asasi.org/papers/2001/Four%20Unrelated%20Accidents.pdf

Essentially the rigging was done incorrectly. The gust locks did reduce engine thrust, but didn’t kill it completely. Takeoff roll was 20% longer than calculated.

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