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Can a VFR flight follow the same route of an approved IFR route (such as those found on Forefight Route Adviser) using waypoints and Victor airways?

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    $\begingroup$ With the exception that the VFR flight should be at intervals of 500 feet (eg, 7,500ft, 8,500ft, etc), while IFR flights should be at intervals of 1000 feet (eg. 7,000ft, 8000ft) $\endgroup$ – abelenky Feb 24 at 23:44
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Yes. In fact, before GPS came along, if you were flying somewhere and wanted to use your VOR to get from A to B, that's exactly what you did a lot of the time if it was convenient; fly along the victor airways if they were more or less on your route. IFR traffic is only separated from other IFR traffic and when VFR in non positive control airspace you can go wherever you want notwithstanding other restrictions.

In the GPS era nobody uses VORs very much any more and you can fly direct almost all the time when VFR (I haven't used the VOR in my plane in eons; mostly I just use a tablet or my phone), but there is nothing to stop you from flying along an airway if you feel like it.

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  • $\begingroup$ How does the airspace classification around airways come into play? I'm not sure, but wouldn't the ATC also provide separation to the IFR from the VFR? $\endgroup$ – ymb1 Feb 24 at 23:59
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    $\begingroup$ If you are in airspace that requires a clearance, it requires a clearance and you fly where you're told. If you're in class E that requires no clearance, you can fly on the airway or across it or whatever. If you are out on a sightseeing trip, just meandering about, you may cross all sorts of airways. IFR traffic is only separated from other IFR traffic. An IFR flight in VFR conditions still has to look out for VFR traffic although ATC will help them out as much as possible. This only really happens with GA IFR flights below 10000 ft where you have IFR and VFR GA traffic operating together. $\endgroup$ – John K Feb 25 at 0:11
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For low altitude flights ie below FL180, yes you can. You can use either Victor (VOR) or Tango (RNAV) airways. You will fly at VFR altitudes during cruise, but use of these airways on VFR flights is common. For improved safety and traffic separation, pilots are requested to either file and open a VFR flight plan or request flight following when VFR on Victor or Tango airways, especially near navaids or other high density airspace.

Victor and Tango Airways can also be used for VFR flight segments during composite flight plans like VFR on top, VFR over the top, etc.

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