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If I'm on final in windy conditions and I need excessive rolling and yawing movements to stay on centerline and say, my pitch stays constant - does rolling or yawing change my AOA such that I could stall?

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No that's not how it works. You shouldn't need "yawing" movements on final before the landing flare. That implies that you are using rudder to push the nose left or right to keep the runway sight picture where you want it, a very bad practice.

Never use rudder to stay aligned with the runway, except in the landing flare. Other than that, only use rudder to keep the ball centered, or to side slip to lose altitude. At all times, unless you are side slipping on purpose, use coordinated banked turns to stay aligned with the runway prior to the flare.

The rolling movements should be just those movements required to make coordinated banked turns to adjust heading to stay on centerline, or to get back on centerline. Maybe 20 degrees of bank. Ball centered as much as you can keep it centered in bumps.

Moderate banked turns in a descent with ball centered create zero risk of stalling if speed is attended to. Stall/spin accidents happen when pilots try to shove the nose with rudder to point it at the runway, causing uncoordinated flight, on top of sloppy speed control, so that if they get too slow, with the airplane slipping or skidding, when it stalls it flicks over the inside wing and down you go on your ride to oblivion.

If you are keeping bank angles within reason, ball centered, and speed on the proper approach speed, you won't stall the plane and normal control inputs will not get you close to stalling the plane. And with any modern plane, if you do stall it but the ball is centered, you won't depart in a spin and you can recover instantly. Coordinated ball centered flight is the most critical item after speed control.

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  • $\begingroup$ Isn't staying banked right down to just above the ground basically asking to have the engine under the low wing hit the ground? $\endgroup$ – Sean Jan 15 at 4:14
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    $\begingroup$ Not for most aircraft. In a cross wind you land banked with cross controls (ie, wind from left, left wing down and right rudder to stay aligned with the runway, basically landing in a side slip). On large heavies with underslung engines there is not a lot of bank angle available before one engine contacts, and in those cases you fly to the runway in a level crab and align the nose with a big shot of rudder right before touchdown. In most smaller airplanes including smaller jets you land with wing down side slip same as light aircraft. $\endgroup$ – John K Jan 15 at 5:04
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    $\begingroup$ @Sean That is a concern, and on aircraft like the 747 the recommendation is to touch down in a crab. See aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/58861/… for a discussion, and especially the comments. $\endgroup$ – Terry Jan 15 at 17:34
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Rolling will increase the AoA of the wing that sinks and reduce the AoA of the wing that rises.

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