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I have searched for the audio recorded on the CVR from the US Airways Flight 1549, but all clips and audios I found seems to be audio recorded from the flight control and not from microphones inside the cockpit.

For example:

In this clip, we only hear the pilot sparsely, but the air traffic control and the airport tower controls quite often. Although, we can also see a transcript of what is said in the cockpit, so there obviously exists some recordings from the cockpit.

Where can I listen to the audio recorded from the cockpit and not from the air traffic control?

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marked as duplicate by Sanchises, Community Jan 11 at 10:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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You can't, because it is in fact forbidden to release CVR audio under US law. From the NTSB:

The CVR recordings are treated differently than the other factual information obtained in an accident investigation. Due to the highly sensitive nature of the verbal communications inside the cockpit, Congress has required that the Safety Board not release any part of a CVR audio recording.

Other countries may have different rules.

This rule came about after the crash of Delta Air Lines flight 1141, (commented by @MichaelK)

[...] where the crew — in extremely cruel irony — were bantering on the flight deck about what to say that would get captured on the CVR in case of a crash. That irony was then squared in that the bantering was a directly contributing cause of the crash, in that they forgot to deploy flaps and slats

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    $\begingroup$ You can't listen to it, but you can read the transcripts. This rule is mostly to avoid the stress/grief caused to families as they listen to the last minutes of a loved ones life. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Jan 9 at 15:08
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    $\begingroup$ Trivia about that: this decision came about after the fatal accident of Delta Air Lines 1141 in 1988, where the crew — in extremely cruel irony — were bantering on the flight deck about what to say that would get captured on the CVR in case of a crash. That irony was then squared in that the bantering was a directly contributing cause of the crash, in that they forgot to deploy flaps and slats. $\endgroup$ – MichaelK Jan 9 at 15:52
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    $\begingroup$ @Fattie Want to know the final rub of salt in the wound? It was the CVR recording that revealed that the flap and slat points on the checklists had not been stated by the crew, and that there were no sounds from the handles being moved... thus presenting solid evidence that the flaps and slats were not extended. This recording was then played on the news, the crew's error being laid bare for all hear. As a direct result of this, legislation came into place that the NTSB may not release recordings from CVRs. $\endgroup$ – MichaelK Jan 9 at 17:33
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    $\begingroup$ The 1st amdmt protects a person from being told what to say by the State. It doesn't mandate that investigators have to broadcast the final words of people to the public. $\endgroup$ – John K Jan 9 at 18:50
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    $\begingroup$ "highly sensitive nature" - "[extremely embarrassing and costing us money, so we all got together and lobbied Congress to make it illegal]" $\endgroup$ – Mazura Jan 9 at 23:55
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You can't listen to it due to the regulation mentioned in Sanchises' answer, but you can find the transcripts. There is one here, for example.

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