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According to the AIM 1-1-8, a VOR can be usable at an altitude below the altitude where the VOR is. But the figure only shows the VOR service volume down to zero feet AGL:

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Where I fly, the VOR is at a higher elevation than the airport. Can I consider that the VOR is reliable to use in this situation? I would appreciate any references.

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    $\begingroup$ Would you care to specify the VOR and airport you are referencing? $\endgroup$ – abelenky Dec 18 '18 at 13:39
  • $\begingroup$ I would be appreciated if you give one $\endgroup$ – Taylor Dec 18 '18 at 23:31
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In order to receive a VOR station there must be a line of sight from the airplane to the VOR. This is basically what your chart is referencing, you can maintain line of sight at longer distances at higher altitudes. It could be possible that the VOR is higher than the airplane and you could receive the VOR while flying below the VOR as long as you have line of sight. However it would probably be best to make sure you have enough altitude before you try to intercept the VOR to make sure you don't have a controlled flight into terrain incident.

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    $\begingroup$ Great answer! The CFIT warning is very relevant! $\endgroup$ – Juan Jimenez Dec 18 '18 at 20:42
  • $\begingroup$ "In order to receive a VOR station there must be a line of sight from the airplane to the VOR"... hum do you consider the ground plane reflector below the Alford Loop antennas of a Doppler VOR to be an obstacle (example)? If you do (it is), then the answer is more complex. In addition the gain in the direction of the receiver plays also its role. $\endgroup$ – mins Dec 19 '18 at 13:52

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