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From that aviation photographer, I saw that beauty:

enter image description here

Having in mind the jet engine I would see, let's say as a normal passenger, I am not really able to understand from where I am looking at that engine. Do you?

Could it also be that I am looking in an inner part or something (which might explain the confusion)?


PS: I tried using the m character to medium-size the picture, but no luck.

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    $\begingroup$ The pressure probe at the top tells you where you are. $\endgroup$ – mins Nov 4 '18 at 14:56
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    $\begingroup$ If you know about engines, I guess @mins! :) $\endgroup$ – gsamaras Nov 4 '18 at 15:01
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Based on the Linkedin page, this is a portion of an IAE V2500 turbofan. Looking at the following images of the engine (in modules and awaiting final assembly), I can pick out a view that is really similar to the image you have up, namely the module of the engine in the bottom right hand corner of the image or the one in the background, behind the fan section that is near the center of the image.

V2500 modules

Looking at a cutaway of the V2500 (below), you can pick out similarities between this section and the engine if viewed from directly behind the fan.

V2500 cutaway

Based on this, a schematic of the V2500 engine modules (below), and the insulation laid out in the bottom of the photo that you posted, I think that the picture you found is taken from inside of the engine, directly behind the fan section and looking aft. The only things that I'm unsure about are background (appears solid?) and perspective (looks like the engine is in a tube--fan was removed, but the shroud is still on?).

V2500 Module Schematic

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    $\begingroup$ The first picture is very enlightening, +1! "picture taken from inside of the engine, directly behind the fan section and looking aft. " What is "aft"? Since, as you see, some parts are still unclear, I will leave the question open for a while, to see if something else comes up. :) $\endgroup$ – gsamaras Nov 3 '18 at 19:52
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    $\begingroup$ @gsamaras: "Aft" about aircraft and ships is the opposite of "forward" -- that is, in the direction that goes from the nose to the tail of the craft. $\endgroup$ – Henning Makholm Nov 3 '18 at 19:59
  • $\begingroup$ Ah that kind of info is superb @HenningMakholm, thanks. Observe however how the depth in "my" image is distorting the linearity of the layers of the parts... $\endgroup$ – gsamaras Nov 3 '18 at 20:03
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    $\begingroup$ @gsamaras It's not taken "from inside the engine". It's just a picture taken from in front of the engine, after the fan has been removed for some reason. IF you are puzzled about how you could remove the complete fan assembly in one piece (it's big and heavy!) the answer is that you turn the front module (the piece the guy in the red shirt is working on) so it is vertical, and then lift the fan out with a crane. $\endgroup$ – alephzero Feb 3 at 13:53
  • $\begingroup$ @alephzero good insight, thanks! $\endgroup$ – gsamaras Feb 3 at 14:31
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This is IAE V2500 engine inlet (forward section) of an engine without the LP (low-pressure fan), how it' the forward section? just have a look on the NAC TEMP SENSOR which is going to be always placed in front of the engine. Cheers :)

enter image description hereenter image description here

photo source :https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-closeup-of-the-air-inlet-of-an-iae-v2500-turbofan-engine-39488888.html

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    $\begingroup$ The answers agree, that's good. $\endgroup$ – gsamaras Dec 29 '18 at 20:28

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