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Airports seem to have strict rules for the amount of liquids the passengers are allowed to take on a plane.

Why is that so?

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closed as off-topic by fooot, xxavier, Ralph J, kevin, SMS von der Tann Oct 27 '18 at 16:11

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about aviation, within the scope defined in the help center." – fooot, xxavier, Ralph J, kevin, SMS von der Tann
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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It is in part due to the 2006 transatlantic aircraft plot, a plan to use explosives disguised as soft drinks to bring down a series of airplanes. As for how they chose the 3 oz. 1 Liter bag rule:

In an interview, Mr. Hawley explained that security officials in the United States, Britain and elsewhere quickly determined that the liquids explosion plot was “chillingly real.”

In August 2006, the thwarted terrorists were planning to use “a formulation that was specifically put together to get around our screening measures,”

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Tests showed that a container of a certain size is needed for an effective explosion. Separate three-ounce containers limited in number to what will fit inside a single one-quart bag do not have “enough critical diameter” to blow up an aircraft, he said.

This is similar to why you also now need to put your shoes through the X-Ray Machine.

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