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I don't know if this is the right place to ask, but I am looking for lift-to-drag ratios (L/D) of different airliners. I have found a paper [1] which has some estimates of L/D for some jetliners, but it's a limited sample Table 3. Estimated aerodynamic characteristics of jet airplanes (L1011, a few Boeing, Douglas and Airbus). This question also looks promising, but delivers airfoil numbers, not aircraft numbers, sadly. Is there any online resource or a place that might point me in the right direction?

[1] Historical evolution of air transport productivity and efficiency Rodrigo Martínez-Val, Emilio Pérez and José F. Palacín Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain, 28040

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  • $\begingroup$ In a book written by the noted aerospace engineer Henk Tennekes, (The Simple Science of Flight, MIT Press, 2009) the L/D of the Boeing 777 is mentioned 'as almost 20', and the best L/D of a Boeing 747 as 18. $\endgroup$ – xxavier Oct 25 '18 at 12:41
  • $\begingroup$ @xxavier - that looks like an answer to me. $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Oct 25 '18 at 14:02
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In quotable literature, I recommend „Aerodynamic Design of Transport Aircraft“ by Obert. In other useful stuff, there is a very useable (but not proven by Boeing) aerodynamic model of a 787 available on the Piano X website.

I‘d add that for any really useful analysis other than level flight, getting hold of a decent engine model giving maximum and minimum (net) thrust as well as fuel flows throughout the operating range will, in my experience, prove much harder than the aerodynamics...

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  • $\begingroup$ With regard to thrust and fuel flow, would you find some of that info in the performance section of the flight manual (assuming that is available on line)? $\endgroup$ – Penguin Oct 27 '18 at 3:36
  • $\begingroup$ @Penguin True, if that’s available. That’ll get you useable takeoff, climb and probably cruise. For descent at idle thrust, engine and particularly nacelle drag is a very important factor, and it’s not always easy to even find out whether that’s wrapped into the aerodynamic model (not often the case) or the engine model; if the latter, that particular data is hard to get by as it will not be in normal aircraft or engine documentation. $\endgroup$ – Cpt Reynolds Oct 27 '18 at 9:47

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