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From that Cessna-150's data, it used Continental 0-200-A 100 HP (75 kW) at 2,750 RPM and with Fixed Pitch propeller with its diameter=69 inches. If power is delivered maximum to the propeller (through direct shaft), then what is power of the propeller to push (thrust) the airplane?

Engine (100HP) ==> Propeller ==> Thrust (? %)

Additional Data of Cessna-150: Weight of loaded: 680 kgs. Weight of Empty: 437 kgs. Wing loading: 9.4 psf (45.8 kg/m²) Power loading: 15 lb/hp (6.81 kg/hp) Maximum Engine Power: 100HP (75kW). Wing Span: 10.2 m.

more detail about the plane can be seen here: http://www.skytamer.com/Cessna_150C.html

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    $\begingroup$ It varies widely depending on the propeller pitch, diameter and forward speed at the time but the rule of thumb I use is around 3-4lbs of thrust per HP while stationary. Lycoming O-320s with fixed pitch props make a static thrust of somewhere around 500 lbs. More with a constant speed prop. An O-200 makes a little over 300 lbs static. $\endgroup$ – John K Oct 22 '18 at 3:51
  • $\begingroup$ Actually what I am asking is specific to the Cessna 150. I added another info my post to give clearer information. Power loading is said 15lb/hp (or 6.81kg/hp) and the propeller 's diameter is 69 inch. Indeed no data of the propeller's pitch. And it is actually part of my question here. As said in the info that the pitch is fixed, that actually my question what is the pitch and how many the thrust power delivered by the propeller. Do you have please reference how to calculate its mathematical? $\endgroup$ – AirCraft Lover Oct 22 '18 at 5:29
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Probably quite low... After a series of gliding experiments made with a Luscombe 8E, and published by the AIAA, the conclusion was that the prop efficiency was around 62%...

https://engineering.purdue.edu/~andrisan/Courses/AAE490A_S2010/Buffer/AIAA-46372-872.pdf

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you Xavier. Interesting. I will read it thoroughly. $\endgroup$ – AirCraft Lover Oct 22 '18 at 11:19

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