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If an aircraft is /Y, /C, or /I (RNAV no GNSS), can they fly an approach chart that says "DME/DME/IRU or GPS required"? GPS in my mind is a GNSS. If you don't have DME/DME/IRU and are RNAV (non-GNSS) capable, can you legally fly the approach?

An example of a chart that has the "DME/DME/IRU or GPS required" notation is here.

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If you don't have DME/DME/IRU and are RNAV (non-GNSS) capable, can you legally fly the approach?

The chart the OP refers to is shown below.

  1. As you can see from the STAR (standard terminal arrival), which is not an "approach" you have to have either "GPS" or a "DME/DME/IRU" capable RNAV system. Older RNAV systems that do not have an IRU (inertial reference system) would not qualify for this STAR.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. Follow-on question: If an aircraft is /Y, /C, or /I (RNAV no GNSS), does it automatically mean that they have a DME/DME/IRU system? $\endgroup$ – slantalpha Oct 23 '18 at 8:47
  • $\begingroup$ @jeff0000- /Y/C/I means RNAV. "RNAV" system does not automatically mean that it (RNAV system) includes an IRU. VOR/DME, DME/DME systems can be RNAV systems. Good info in AC 20-130, AC 20-138, and AC 90-108. $\endgroup$ – 757toga Oct 23 '18 at 14:19

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