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I want to get my category 3 or 4 medical so I can either get my private pilots license or my recreational pilots license. I have been diagnosed with psychosis and am currently on Invega Sustenna (anti psychotic) to combat the condition.

My question is: will I ever be able to get my cat 3 or 4 ? I live in Canada.

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Well, according to the CAA:

Class 1

(a) Psychotic disorder

A history of, or the occurrence of, a functional psychotic disorder is disqualifying unless a cause can be unequivocally identified as one which is transient, has ceased and will not recur.

Class 2

Psychotic disorder

A history of, or the occurrence of, a functional psychotic disorder is disqualifying unless in certain rare cases a cause can be unequivocally identified as one which is transient, has ceased and will not recur.

Discussion on another forum suggests that generally speaking they will want the pilot to be off all psychotropic medication for a period of time (1-2 years) without any recurrences but they will generally allow a pilot to be on medication for depression.

I would recommend you work with an appropriate mental health expert in resolving your condition, so that you can be sure future episodes will not recur, you can then hopefully ascertain to yourself and to your medical examiner that your episode was transient, so that you can continue your pursuit of your PPL.

Remember in the worst case scenario (your condition does not pass), even if you cannot get a medical, you can still fly a plane. You just can’t solo. You can fly with a flight instructor or a certificated pilot. And you can fly a single seat ultralight with no certification. So you will still get to fly, don't worry.

Good luck, I'm sure you can do it.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks for the wise words. I live in Canada so I’m not too sure what the laws are like here. I think I might just make an appointment with a Certified aircraft medical examiner and get some answers for sure. $\endgroup$ – kiefer gallant Oct 18 '18 at 10:14
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    $\begingroup$ @kiefergallant That would be the best way to get an answer. Be warned though, some AME's have the certification, but don't really have a full knowledge of the medical laws. I've had good experiences and bad ones, which is understandable, as they're doctors, not lawyers. $\endgroup$ – M28 Oct 18 '18 at 14:52
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Bringing this question to the public forum shows a lot of strength in character. It is imperative for ALL pilots to evaluate their mental state before flying, as one just can't "pull over and park it" as easily as driving a car.

Loss of a loved one, ending a relationship, financial problems, illness, workload can all weight heavily on our state of mind and affect performance.

It is very important to know our limits and avoid the "triggers" to being unstable. It really starts with an evaluation of self. Think it over. In an aircraft one can go from wings level to unrecoverable in a matter of seconds.

Depending on the nature of the condition, there may be some limitations, but that may not necessarily exclude one from participating in aviation.

As already mentioned, get one (or several) professional evaluations. We all need to be in the safe envelope.

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