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Are there different symbols to identify the different types of fuels used for general aviation aircraft?

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  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by symbols in this context? $\endgroup$ – a CVn Oct 15 '18 at 10:49
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    $\begingroup$ Specific graphyc symbols like letters numbers or something else, to designate each different type... $\endgroup$ – Carlo Nava Oct 15 '18 at 11:23
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As Walker notes in his answer AvGas is typically noted by color when talking about telling it apart. In terms of aircraft markings for fuel this is governed by FAA FAR 23.1557 Miscellaneous markings and placards. and some more notes in this AC,

(c)Fuel, oil, and coolant filler openings. The following apply:

(1) Fuel filler openings must be marked at or near the filler cover with-

  (i) For reciprocating engine-powered airplanes -

    (A) The word “Avgas”; and

    (B) The minimum fuel grade.

These are fairly simple regulations to comply with so there is a wide variety of markings available, but the end results tends to be a decal looking something like this:

enter image description here

(source)

Above ground storage tanks will also have to comply with local state regulations on petroleum storage, here are the New Hampshire regulations as an example. Generally this will require an NFPA style decal but pilots dont really use those to identify anything. The typical signage for 100LL is a red back, white fount, all caps AVGAS 100LL this is common on tanks,

enter image description here

and trucks alike,

(source)

enter image description here

(source)


Its also important that you as the pilot are present for fueling both to verify type and quantity. If there is any doubt about what is in a truck or at a pump some should be pumped into a canister and verified by color before fueling an aircraft.

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  • $\begingroup$ There is also a standard set of symbols/signage for tanker trucks to use - not sure if this only applies on public road or if an airport tank truck like pictured would need to have it as well. dtectsystems.blogspot.com/2013/04/… $\endgroup$ – ivanivan Oct 16 '18 at 16:33
  • $\begingroup$ My Cessna only requires this wording to be in place "Aft of the fuel tank": "Service this airplane with 91 / 96 minimum or 100 / 130 grade aviation gasoline. Total capacity 25 gal. Capacity to line of holes inside filler neck 22.0." $\endgroup$ – CrossRoads Oct 16 '18 at 18:12
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Aviation Fuels are dyed different colors.

  • Jet A = Straw or Clear
  • 82 Un-Leaded = Purple
  • 100 Low Lead = Blue
  • 100/130 = Green

When there were more grades containing lead there was Red and Orange. Purple was 115/145 used in high power and military applications.

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  • $\begingroup$ What colour is Jet B dyed? $\endgroup$ – Sean Oct 16 '18 at 2:56
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There is 87 Mogas, 100 Low Lead (100LL), and 130. 100LL is pretty common for the 4 and 6 cylinder general aviation aircraft (single and 2, 4, 6 seaters with one and two engines).

87 and 130 are getting less and less common. I don't think I've ever seen 130, altho my plane is placarded to use 100LL or 130.

Larger planes than that and you start seeing Jet A fuel used in single engine and twin turboprops, turbine, and turbofan equipped planes.

For example, in western NY, you can see prices in the Buffalo area for Jet A, 100LL, and Mogas: http://www.airnav.com/fuel/local.html enter BUF or KBUF. You can try other areas also, such as LAX (Los Angeles), FTW (Fort Worth), JFK, STL (St Louis).

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    $\begingroup$ I don't think the OP is asking what the different types of fuels are, they seem to be asking if those fuels have an associated symbol. $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Oct 15 '18 at 13:11
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    $\begingroup$ Only the name, as far as I know. $\endgroup$ – CrossRoads Oct 15 '18 at 13:16
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    $\begingroup$ Thank you anyway $\endgroup$ – Carlo Nava Oct 15 '18 at 13:47

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